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Improving Forecasting via Multiple Temporal Aggregation

Author

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  • Fotios Petropoulos
  • Nikolaos Kourentzes

Abstract

In most business forecasting applications, the decision-making need we have directs the frequency of the data we collect (monthly, weekly, etc.) and use for forecasting. In this article, Fotios and Nikolaos introduce an approach that combines forecasts generated by modeling the different frequencies (levels of temporal aggregation). Their technique augments our information about the data used for forecasting and, as such, can result in more accurate forecasts. It also automatically reconciles the forecasts at different levels. Copyright International Institute of Forecasters, 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Fotios Petropoulos & Nikolaos Kourentzes, 2014. "Improving Forecasting via Multiple Temporal Aggregation," Foresight: The International Journal of Applied Forecasting, International Institute of Forecasters, issue 34, pages 12-17, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:for:ijafaa:y:2014:i:34:p:12-17
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Konstantinos Nikolopoulos & Fotios Petropoulos & Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues & Stephen Pettit & Anthony Beresford, 2019. "A risk-mitigation model driven from the level of forecastability of Black Swans: prepare and respond to major Earthquakes through a dynamic Temporal and Spatial Aggregation forecasting framework," Working Papers 19017, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).
    2. Kourentzes, Nikolaos & Petropoulos, Fotios, 2016. "Forecasting with multivariate temporal aggregation: The case of promotional modelling," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 181(PA), pages 145-153.
    3. Mamingi Nlandu, 2017. "Beauty and Ugliness of Aggregation over Time: A Survey," Review of Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 68(3), pages 205-227, December.
    4. Babai, Zied & Boylan, John E. & Kolassa, Stephan & Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos, 2016. "Supply chain forecasting: Theory, practice, their gap and the futureAuthor-Name: Syntetos, Aris A," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 252(1), pages 1-26.
    5. Petropoulos, Fotios & Apiletti, Daniele & Assimakopoulos, Vassilios & Babai, Mohamed Zied & Barrow, Devon K. & Ben Taieb, Souhaib & Bergmeir, Christoph & Bessa, Ricardo J. & Bijak, Jakub & Boylan, Joh, 2022. "Forecasting: theory and practice," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 705-871.
      • Fotios Petropoulos & Daniele Apiletti & Vassilios Assimakopoulos & Mohamed Zied Babai & Devon K. Barrow & Souhaib Ben Taieb & Christoph Bergmeir & Ricardo J. Bessa & Jakub Bijak & John E. Boylan & Jet, 2020. "Forecasting: theory and practice," Papers 2012.03854, arXiv.org, revised Jan 2022.
    6. Jeon, Jooyoung & Panagiotelis, Anastasios & Petropoulos, Fotios, 2019. "Probabilistic forecast reconciliation with applications to wind power and electric load," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 279(2), pages 364-379.
    7. Petropoulos, Fotios & Svetunkov, Ivan, 2020. "A simple combination of univariate models," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 110-115.
    8. Fotios Petropoulos & Evangelos Spiliotis, 2021. "The Wisdom of the Data: Getting the Most Out of Univariate Time Series Forecasting," Forecasting, MDPI, vol. 3(3), pages 1-20, June.
    9. Spiliotis, Evangelos & Petropoulos, Fotios & Kourentzes, Nikolaos & Assimakopoulos, Vassilios, 2018. "Cross-temporal aggregation: Improving the forecast accuracy of hierarchical electricity consumption," MPRA Paper 91762, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Barrow, Devon K., 2016. "Forecasting intraday call arrivals using the seasonal moving average method," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(12), pages 6088-6096.
    11. Spiliotis, Evangelos & Petropoulos, Fotios & Kourentzes, Nikolaos & Assimakopoulos, Vassilios, 2020. "Cross-temporal aggregation: Improving the forecast accuracy of hierarchical electricity consumption," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 261(C).

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