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Explaining the NYSE Listing Choices of NASDAQ Firms

Author

Listed:
  • Arnold R. Cowan
  • Richard B. Carter
  • Frederick H. Dark
  • Ajai K. Singh

Abstract

Traditionally, financial theory has offered little guidance to managers who must choose whether to list their stock on an exchange or allow it to continue trading over-the-counter. Recent developments in market microstructure theory allow a more careful analysis of the exchange listing decision. Market microstructure theory implies that firms list their stocks on exchanges to reduce transaction costs to their investors. A major component of the cost of trading common stocks is the bid-ask spread. Several differences exist between the trading arrangements, or microstructure, of the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ that may contribute to differences in bid-ask spreads for a given stock depending on where it is traded.

Suggested Citation

  • Arnold R. Cowan & Richard B. Carter & Frederick H. Dark & Ajai K. Singh, 1992. "Explaining the NYSE Listing Choices of NASDAQ Firms," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 21(4), Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:fma:fmanag:cowan92
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Papaioannou, George J. & Travlos, Nickolaos G. & Viswanathan, K.G., 2009. "Visibility effects and timing in stock listing changes: Evidence from operating performance," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 357-377, May.
    2. Thierry Foucault & Christine A. Parlour, 2004. "Competition for Listings," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 35(2), pages 329-355, Summer.
    3. McConnell, John J. & Dybevik, Heidi J. & Haushalter, David & Lie, Erik, 1996. "A survey of evidence on domestic and international stock exchange listings with implications for markets and managers," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 347-376, December.
    4. Tse, Yiuman & Devos, Erik, 2004. "Trading costs, investor recognition and market response: An analysis of firms that move from the Amex (Nasdaq) to Nasdaq (Amex)," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 63-83, January.
    5. Battalio, Robert & Hatch, Brian & Loughran, Tim, 2011. "Who benefited from the disclosure mandates of the 1964 Securities Acts Amendments?," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 1047-1063, September.
    6. Bakera, H. Kent & Powell, Gary E. & Weaver, Daniel G., 1999. "The visibility effects of Amex listing," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 341-361.
    7. Kedia, Simi & Panchapagesan, Venkatesh, 2011. "Why do only some Nasdaq firms switch to the NYSE? Evidence from corporate transactions," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 109-126, February.
    8. Lau, Sie Ting & McInish, Thomas H., 2003. "Trading volume and location of trade: Evidence from Jardine group listings in Hong Kong and Singapore," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 1411-1425, August.

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