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Booms and busts: the case of subprime mortgages


  • Edward M. Gramlich


Booms and busts have played a prominent role in American economic history. In the 19th century, the United States benefited from the canal boom, the railroad boom, the minerals boom, and a financial boom. The 20th century brought another financial boom, a postwar boom, and a dot-com boom. ; The details differed, but each of these cases featured initial discoveries or breakthroughs, widespread adoption, widespread investment, and then a collapse where prices could not keep up and many investors lost a lot of money. When the dust cleared, there was financial carnage and many investors learning to be more careful the next time. But fruits of the boom were still around to benefit productivity. ; The late Edward M. Gramlich prepared the luncheon address for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City’s 2007 symposium last summer in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. This article, based on his speech, describes why he believed the subprime lending market, despite its problems, is a promising development that has permitted low-income and minority borrowers to participate in credit markets.

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  • Edward M. Gramlich, 2007. "Booms and busts: the case of subprime mortgages," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q IV, pages 105-113.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedker:y:2007:i:qiv:p:105-113:n:v.92no.4

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    Cited by:

    1. Michele Fratianni & Francesco Marchionne, 2010. "The Banking Bailout of the Subprime Crisis: Size and Effects," PSL Quarterly Review, Economia civile, vol. 63(254), pages 187-233.
    2. Gunther Tichy, 2011. "Why did policy ignore the harbingers of the crisis?," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 38(1), pages 107-130, February.
    3. Gunther Tichy, 2010. "War die Finanzkrise vorhersehbar?," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 11(4), pages 356-382, November.
    4. Adrian Blundell-Wignall & Caroline Roulet, 2013. "Business models of banks, leverage and the distance-to-default," OECD Journal: Financial Market Trends, OECD Publishing, vol. 2012(2), pages 7-34.
    5. Michal Jurek & Pawel Marszalek, 2014. "Subprime mortgages and the MBSs in generating and transmitting the global financial crisis," Working papers wpaper40, Financialisation, Economy, Society & Sustainable Development (FESSUD) Project.
    6. Michele Fratianni & Francesco Marchionne, 2009. "Rescuing Banks from the Effects of the Financial Crisis," Working Papers 2009-04, Indiana University, Kelley School of Business, Department of Business Economics and Public Policy.
    7. Michele Fratianni & Francesco Marchionne, 2009. "The Role of Banks in the Subprime Financial Crisis," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 23, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    8. Jörg Bibow, 2010. "Alternative Strategien der Budgetkonsolidierung in Österreich nach der Rezession," IMK Studies 03-2010, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    9. M. Imtiaz Mazumder & Nazneen Ahmad, 2010. "Greed, financial innovation or laxity of regulation?: A close look into the 2007-2009 financial crisis and stock market volatility," Studies in Economics and Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 27(2), pages 110-134, June.

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