IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/transa/v32y1998i2p129-137.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Driver memory: Motorist selection and retention of individualized headways in highway traffic

Author

Listed:
  • Cassidy, Michael J.
  • Windover, John R.

Abstract

The paper presents evidence that (1) drivers have different personalities in that they follow vehicles at different headways, and (2) drivers retain their personalities in that each driver tends to maintain his headway over space and, in some instances, drivers return to their headways after being forced by a traffic disturbance to alter them temporarily. This attribute, which we term driver memory, is revealed by visual inspection of modified curves of measured cumulative vehicle arrival number versus time.

Suggested Citation

  • Cassidy, Michael J. & Windover, John R., 1998. "Driver memory: Motorist selection and retention of individualized headways in highway traffic," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 129-137, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:32:y:1998:i:2:p:129-137
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965-8564(97)00027-X
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cassidy, Michael J., 1998. "Bivariate relations in nearly stationary highway traffic," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 49-59, January.
    2. Daganzo, Carlos F., 1995. "Requiem for second-order fluid approximations of traffic flow," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 277-286, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mauch, Michael, 2002. "Analyses of Start-Stop Waves in Congested Freeway Traffic," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt9kb9x6n5, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Ahn, Soyoung & Cassidy, Michael J. & Laval, Jorge, 2004. "Verification of a simplified car-following theory," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 431-440, June.
    3. Mauch, Michael & Cassidy, Michael J., 2004. "Freeway Traffic Oscillations: Observations and Predictions," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt89c3h1vv, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. repec:eee:transb:v:119:y:2019:i:c:p:1-21 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:phsmap:v:514:y:2019:i:c:p:786-795 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Chiabaut, Nicolas & Leclercq, Ludovic & Buisson, Christine, 2010. "From heterogeneous drivers to macroscopic patterns in congestion," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 299-308, February.
    7. Kim, Kwangho & Cassidy, Michael J., 2012. "A capacity-increasing mechanism in freeway traffic," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 46(9), pages 1260-1272.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:32:y:1998:i:2:p:129-137. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/547/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.