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Indices of socioeconomic position across the life course as predictors of coronary calcification in black and white men and women: Coronary artery risk development in young adults study

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  • Matthews, Karen A.
  • Schwartz, Joseph E.
  • Cohen, Sheldon

Abstract

Few studies have investigated the association of socioeconomic status (SES) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) and only one study has examined African Americans separately from Caucasians, despite empirical evidence suggesting that blacks have equivalent or lower CAC, relative to whites. We tested the hypotheses that lower childhood SES and lower average education, occupation, and income and change in SES (slope) in adulthood are related to risk of CAC in blacks and whites in the US CARDIA study. Parental education and occupation were measured at study entry (Year 0 in 1985-1986) and participant education, occupation, and household income were evaluated multiple times throughout a 20 year follow-up period at four sites in the United States. CAC was measured at Year 20 in 3138 (45% black) participants in CARDIA; 19% had CAC. Latent growth models and multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusted for the major risk factors for CAC. Multivariate models showed that lower paternal education in blacks and lower maternal occupational status in the full sample and in whites were related to higher risk of any CAC, independent of adult SES. Lower average adult education, occupation, and income were related to higher risk of any CAC, with the effects primarily in blacks. Our results are the first to show that SES, measured retrospectively and prospectively in multiple ways, is related to CAC, and the first to document the effects primarily in blacks.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthews, Karen A. & Schwartz, Joseph E. & Cohen, Sheldon, 2011. "Indices of socioeconomic position across the life course as predictors of coronary calcification in black and white men and women: Coronary artery risk development in young adults study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(5), pages 768-774, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:73:y:2011:i:5:p:768-774
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hart, C.L. & Smith, G.D. & Blane, D., 1998. "Inequalities in mortality by social class measured at 3 stages of the lifecourse," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 88(3), pages 471-474.
    2. Geronimus, A.T. & Hicken, M. & Keene, D. & Bound, J., 2006. ""Weathering" and age patterns of allostatic load scores among blacks and whites in the United States," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 96(5), pages 826-833.
    3. McDonough, P. & Duncan, G.J. & Williams, D. & House, J., 1997. "Income dynamics and adult mortality in the United States, 1972 through 1989," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 87(9), pages 1476-1483.
    4. Lemelin, Emily T. & Diez Roux, Ana V. & Franklin, Tracy G. & Carnethon, Mercedes & Lutsey, Pamela L. & Ni, Hanyu & O'Meara, Ellen & Shrager, Sandi, 2009. "Life-course socioeconomic positions and subclinical atherosclerosis in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 444-451, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lockwood, Tony & Coffee, Neil T & Rossini, Peter & Niyonsenga, Theo & McGreal, Stanley, 2018. "Does where you live influence your socio-economic status?," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 152-160.

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