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Social transfers and the health status of mothers in Norway and Canada

Author

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  • Curtis, Lori
  • Phipps, Shelley

Abstract

The unconditional health status of lone mothers is worse than that of married mothers in Canada but not in Norway. Even controlling for demographic characteristics and health behaviours in Canada, the health status of lone mothers is worse. Only after we control for income does the differential in health status between married and lone mothers in Canada disappear. An important difference between the countries is that lone mothers are much less likely to be poor in Norway because they receive more generous social transfers. A simulation which involves 'giving Canadian mothers Norwegian transfers,' illustrates the possibility of significant gains in socioeconomic status and health of poor mothers in Canada.

Suggested Citation

  • Curtis, Lori & Phipps, Shelley, 2004. "Social transfers and the health status of mothers in Norway and Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(12), pages 2499-2507, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:58:y:2004:i:12:p:2499-2507
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Fritzell, Sara & Burstrom, Bo, 2006. "Economic strain and self-rated health among lone and couple mothers in Sweden during the 1990s compared to the 1980s," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 79(2-3), pages 253-264, December.
    2. Janet Currie & Mark Stabile, 2007. "Mental Health in Childhood and Human Capital," NBER Chapters,in: The Problems of Disadvantaged Youth: An Economic Perspective, pages 115-148 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Lori J. Curtis & William J. MacMinn, 2007. "Health-Care Utilization in Canada: 25 Years of Evidence," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 190, McMaster University.
    4. Karen Watkins, 2016. "Health, Leisure, and Life Cycle: A Gender Approach in the Tropics," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(3), pages 1049-1064, April.
    5. Schrecker, Ted, 2007. "Intra-metropolitan health disparities in Canada: Studying how and why globalization matters, and what to do about it," Center for Global, International and Regional Studies, Working Paper Series qt3z7544g1, Center for Global, International and Regional Studies, UC Santa Cruz.
    6. Dong-Sik Kim & Gyeong-Suk Jeon & Soong-Nang Jang, 2010. "Socioeconomic status, social support and self-rated health among lone mothers in South Korea," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 55(6), pages 551-559, December.
    7. Lori J. Curtis & William J. MacMinn, 2008. "Health Care Utilization in Canada: Twenty-five Years of Evidence," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 34(1), pages 65-88, March.
    8. Stefanie Sperlich & Sonja Arnhold-Kerri & Siegfried Geyer, 2011. "What accounts for depressive symptoms among mothers? The impact of socioeconomic status, family structure and psychosocial stress," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 56(4), pages 385-396, August.

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