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The voracity effect revisited

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  • Strulik, Holger

Abstract

In an influential article Tornell and Lane (1999) considered an economy, populated by multiple powerful groups, in which property rights in the formal sector are not protected. They argued that then investment in an informal sector may be optimal and set up conditions for “voracity” such that a permanent positive shock in the formal sector leads to lower economic growth. Here I show that whenever investing in the informal sector is feasible, not investing in the informal sector is a Pareto-superior Nash equilibrium under the mild condition of an elasticity of intertemporal substitution in consumption smaller than unity. As a corollary, voracity disappears.

Suggested Citation

  • Strulik, Holger, 2012. "The voracity effect revisited," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 272-276.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:matsoc:v:64:y:2012:i:3:p:272-276
    DOI: 10.1016/j.mathsocsci.2012.05.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ines Lindner & Holger Strulik, 2008. "Social Fractionalization, Endogenous Appropriation Norms, and Economic Development," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(298), pages 244-258, May.
    2. Barro, Robert J & Mankiw, N Gregory & Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1995. "Capital Mobility in Neoclassical Models of Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(1), pages 103-115, March.
    3. Guvenen, Fatih, 2006. "Reconciling conflicting evidence on the elasticity of intertemporal substitution: A macroeconomic perspective," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(7), pages 1451-1472, October.
    4. Strulik, Holger, 2012. "Poverty, voracity, and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 396-403.
    5. Attanasio, Orazio P & Browning, Martin, 1995. "Consumption over the Life Cycle and over the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1118-1137, December.
    6. John Y. Campbell & N. Gregory Mankiw, 1989. "Consumption, Income and Interest Rates: Reinterpreting the Time Series Evidence," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1989, Volume 4, pages 185-246, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Hall, Robert E, 1988. "Intertemporal Substitution in Consumption," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(2), pages 339-357, April.
    8. repec:fth:harver:1435 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1990. "Supply-Side Economics: An Analytical Review," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(2), pages 293-316, April.
    10. Masao Ogaki & Jonathan D. Ostry & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1996. "Saving Behavior in Low- and Middle-Income Developing Countries: A Comparison," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 43(1), pages 38-71, March.
    11. Philip R. Lane & Aaron Tornell, 1999. "The Voracity Effect," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(1), pages 22-46, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fabbri, G. & Faggian, S. & Freni, G., 2018. "Spatial resource wars: A two region example," Working Papers 2018-04, Grenoble Applied Economics Laboratory (GAEL).
    2. Giorgio Fabbri & Silvia Faggian & Giuseppe Freni, 2019. "Policy Effectiveness In Spatial Resource Wars: A Two-Region Model," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2019012, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).

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