IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jrpoli/v37y2012i2p179-184.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Mission impossible?: Adopting a CSR-based business model for extractive industries in developing countries

Author

Listed:
  • Slack, Keith

Abstract

Corporations in the extractive industries often state their commitment to “corporate social responsibility” principles, but their actual implementation of these principles, particularly in developing countries, is questionable. This contradiction between rhetoric and reality is attributable to the fact that these companies have not fully integrated CSR into their business models. This can been seen in assessments of projects' costs and benefits, project and technology selection, respect for community consent, and performance incentive structures. The Marlin gold mine in Guatemala provides a concrete example of these sharp contradictions between stated CSR commitments and actual performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Slack, Keith, 2012. "Mission impossible?: Adopting a CSR-based business model for extractive industries in developing countries," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 179-184.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jrpoli:v:37:y:2012:i:2:p:179-184
    DOI: 10.1016/j.resourpol.2011.02.003
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301420711000109
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kolstad, Ivar & Wiig, Arne, 2009. "Is Transparency the Key to Reducing Corruption in Resource-Rich Countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 521-532, March.
    2. Bush, Ray, 2009. "'Soon there will be no-one left to take the corpses to the morgue': Accumulation and abjection in Ghana's mining communities," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1-2), pages 57-63.
    3. Virginia Haufler, 2010. "Disclosure as Governance: The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative and Resource Management in the Developing World," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 10(3), pages 53-73, August.
    4. Anthony Bebbington & Leonith Hinojosa & Denise Humphreys Bebbington & Maria Luisa Burneo & Ximena Warnaars, 2008. "Contention and Ambiguity: Mining and the Possibilities of Development," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 5708, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Larsen, Rasmus Kløcker & Mamosso, Christiane Alzouma, 2014. "Aid with Blinkers: Environmental Governance of Uranium Mining in Niger," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 62-76.
    2. Kowalska, Izabela Jonek, 2014. "Risk management in the hard coal mining industry: Social and environmental aspects of collieries’ liquidation," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 124-134.
    3. Moomen, Abdul–Wadood & Dewan, Ashraf, 2016. "Analysis of spatial interactions between the Shea industry and mining sector activities in the emerging north-west gold province of Ghana," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 104-111.
    4. repec:eee:worbus:v:53:y:2018:i:1:p:27-38 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Moomen, Abdul–Wadood, 2017. "Strategies for managing large-scale mining sector land use conflicts in the global south," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 85-93.
    6. repec:eee:jrpoli:v:53:y:2017:i:c:p:109-116 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:eee:jrpoli:v:52:y:2017:i:c:p:366-376 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Van Alstine, James & Barkemeyer, Ralf, 2014. "Business and development: Changing discourses in the extractive industries," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 4-16.
    9. Lyons, Margaret & Bartlett, Jennifer & McDonald, Paula, 2016. "Corporate social responsibility in junior and mid-tier resources companies operating in developing nations – beyond the public relations offensive," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 204-213.
    10. Gupta, Kartick, 2017. "Are oil and gas firms more likely to engage in unethical practices than other firms?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 101-112.
    11. Toni Aubynn, 2017. "Regulatory structures and challenges to developmental extractives: Some practical observations from Ghana," WIDER Working Paper Series 179, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Caxaj, C. Susana & Berman, Helene & Varcoe, Colleen & Ray, Susan L. & Restoulec, Jean-Paul, 2014. "Gold mining on Mayan-Mam territory: Social unravelling, discord and distress in the Western highlands of Guatemala," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 50-57.
    13. Jonek Kowalska, Izabela, 2015. "Challenges for long-term industry restructuring in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin: What has Polish coal mining achieved and failed from a twenty-year perspective?," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 135-149.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mining; Poverty; Development; Guatemala; Human; Rights;

    JEL classification:

    • L72 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Primary Products and Construction - - - Mining, Extraction, and Refining: Other Nonrenewable Resources

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jrpoli:v:37:y:2012:i:2:p:179-184. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30467 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.