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A longitudinal study of financial risk tolerance

Author

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  • Van de Venter, Gerhard
  • Michayluk, David
  • Davey, Geoff

Abstract

Academics are divided as to whether financial risk tolerance is an enduring psychological trait and as a consequence is less likely to change over the life of an individual, or a variable psychological state which varies readily in response to internal and external influences. In this study we report the findings of a longitudinal study that investigates the annual change in financial risk tolerance scores of individuals over a 5year period and the factors that influence such change. Our results indicate a relatively small annual change in individuals’ financial risk tolerance. Although our regression model is ineffective in providing a clarification for a change in the financial risk tolerance scores of individual respondents, we find a slight decrease in financial risk tolerance associated with a decrease in household size and an increase in financial risk tolerance after terminating the services of a financial planner. From our results we propose that financial risk tolerance is a stable personality trait and is unlikely to change substantially over the life of an individual.

Suggested Citation

  • Van de Venter, Gerhard & Michayluk, David & Davey, Geoff, 2012. "A longitudinal study of financial risk tolerance," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 794-800.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:33:y:2012:i:4:p:794-800
    DOI: 10.1016/j.joep.2012.03.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Grable, John & Lytton, Ruth H., 1999. "Financial risk tolerance revisited: the development of a risk assessment instrument," Financial Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 163-181.
    2. David Cesarini & Christopher T. Dawes & Magnus Johannesson & Paul Lichtenstein & Björn Wallace, 2009. "Genetic Variation in Preferences for Giving and Risk Taking," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(2), pages 809-842.
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    5. Robert Faff & Terrence Hallahan & Michael McKenzie, 2009. "Nonlinear linkages between financial risk tolerance and demographic characteristics," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(13), pages 1329-1332.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Necker, Sarah & Ziegelmeyer, Michael, 2016. "Household risk taking after the financial crisis," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 141-160.
    2. Sara Jonsson & Inga-Lill Söderberg, 2018. "Investigating explanatory theories on laypeople’s risk perception of personal economic collapse in a bank crisis – the Cyprus case," Journal of Risk Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(6), pages 763-779, June.
    3. Anbar, Adem & Eker, Melek, 2019. "The Effect of Sociodemographic Variables and Love of Money on Financial Risk Tolerance of Bankers," Business and Economics Research Journal, Uludag University, Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, vol. 10(4), pages 855-866, July.
    4. Sandip Chattopadhyay & Ranjan Dasgupta, 2015. "Demographic and Socioeconomic Impact on Risk Attitudes of the Indian Investors - An Empirical Study," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(4), pages 601-623, April.
    5. Cheng, Teng Yuan & Lee, Chun I & Lin, Chao Hsien, 2013. "An examination of the relationship between the disposition effect and gender, age, the traded security, and bull–bear market conditions," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 195-213.
    6. Heenkenda, Shirantha, 2014. "Determination of Financial Risk Tolerance among Different Household Sectors in Sri Lanka," MPRA Paper 67324, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Anindya Chakrabarty & Anupam De & Gautam Bandyopadhyay, 2016. "Horizon heterogeneity, institutional constraint and managerial myopia: a multi-frequency perspective on ELSS," International Journal of Business Excellence, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 9(1), pages 18-47.
    8. Zandri Dickason-Koekemoer & Suné Ferreira, 2018. "Subjective Risk Tolerance of South African Investors," Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, AMH International, vol. 10(6), pages 286-294.
    9. David Morton de Lachapelle & Damien Challet, 2009. "Turnover, account value and diversification of real traders: evidence of collective portfolio optimizing behavior," Papers 0912.4723, arXiv.org, revised Jun 2010.
    10. Hermansson, Cecilia, 2016. "Relationships between bank customers’ risk attitudes and their balance sheets," Working Paper Series 15/12, Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Real Estate and Construction Management & Banking and Finance.
    11. Shirantha Heenkenda, 2015. "Determination of financial risk tolerance among different household sectors in Sri Lanka," Asian Journal of Empirical Research, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(11), pages 206-220, November.
    12. Mihai Chişu, 2019. "Risk Aversion And Financial Effects Into The Asset Management Industry," Romanian Economic Business Review, Romanian-American University, vol. 14(2), pages 25-39, June.
    13. Fisher, Patti J. & Yao, Rui, 2017. "Gender differences in financial risk tolerance," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 191-202.
    14. Suné Ferreira & Zandri Dickason-Koekemoer, 2019. "The Relationship Between Depositor Behaviour and Risk Tolerance in a South African Context," Advances in Decision Sciences, Asia University, Taiwan, vol. 23(3), pages 36-55, September.
    15. Ian Smith, 2016. "A study into UK Financial Planners opinions on risk tolerance and risk perception," Proceedings of International Academic Conferences 4006388, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    16. Brian Lucey & Charles Larkin, 2012. "Risk Tolerance and Demographic Characteristics: Preliminary Irish Evidence," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp406, IIIS.
    17. Zandri Koekemoer, 2019. "The influence of the level of education on investors risk tolerance level," Proceedings of Economics and Finance Conferences 9511449, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial risk tolerance; Risk assessment; Financial planning; Longitudinal study;

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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