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Empirical evidence on the insulation properties of fixed and flexible exchange rates : The Japanese experience

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  • Hutchison, Michael
  • Walsh, Carl E.

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  • Hutchison, Michael & Walsh, Carl E., 1992. "Empirical evidence on the insulation properties of fixed and flexible exchange rates : The Japanese experience," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3-4), pages 241-263, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:inecon:v:32:y:1992:i:3-4:p:241-263
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    Cited by:

    1. Barry Eichengreen & Mariko Hatase, 2005. "Can a Rapidly-Growing Export-Oriented Economy Smoothly Exit an Exchange Rate Peg? Lessons for China from Japan's High-Growth Era," NBER Working Papers 11625, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Mark Crosby, 2004. "Exchange Rate Volatility and Macroeconomic Performance in Hong Kong," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(4), pages 606-623, November.
    3. Hui, George W. L., 1995. "Flexible exchange rates, capital mobility, and monetary instruments of asymmetric economies," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 149-169.
    4. Lee, Hyun-Hoon & Huh, Hyeon-Seung & Harris, David, 2003. "The relative impact of the US and Japanese business cycles on the Australian economy," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 111-129, January.
    5. Selover, David D. & Jensen, Roderick V., 1999. "'Mode-locking' and international business cycle transmission," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 591-618, February.
    6. Carl E. Walsh, 1993. "What caused the 1990-1991 recession?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 33-48.
    7. Simatele, Munacinga C H, 2004. "Financial sector reforms and monetary policy reforms in Zambia," MPRA Paper 21575, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Michael A. Kouparitsas, 1998. "Are international business cycles different under fixed and flexible exchange rate regimes?," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q I, pages 46-64.
    9. Yin-Wong Cheung, 2000. "Hong Kong Output Dynamics: An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers 112000, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    10. Selover, David D. & Round, David K., 1996. "Business cycle transmission and interdependence between Japan and Australia," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 569-602.
    11. Selover, David D., 1999. "International Interdependence and Business Cycle Transmission in ASEAN," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 230-253, September.
    12. Michael A. Kouparitsas, 2003. "International business cycles under fixed and flexible exchange rate regimes," Working Paper Series WP-03-28, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    13. An, Lian & Kim, Yoonbai & You, Yu, 2016. "Floating exchange rates and macroeconomic independence," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 23-35.
    14. Mark Crosby & Glenn Otto, 2001. "Persistence Of Output Fluctuations Under Alternative Exchange Rate Regimes," Working Papers 072001, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    15. Selover, David D., 2004. "International co-movements and business cycle transmission between Korea and Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 57-83, March.
    16. Selover, David D., 1997. "Business cycle transmission between the United States and Japan: A vector error correction approach," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 385-411, August.
    17. Kunze, Frederik, 2017. "Predicting exchange rates in Asia: New insights on the accuracy of survey forecasts," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 326, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    18. J. Fackler & L. Filer, 2004. "Exchange Rate Targeting and Economic Stabilization," Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings 565, Econometric Society.
    19. Kim, Jongwoo, 2000. "The relationship between the monetary regime and output volatility: a multivariate GARCH-M model of the Japanese experience, 1919-1996," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 49-69, January.
    20. Mark Wheeler & Susan Pozo, 1997. "Is the world economy more integrated today than a century ago?," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 25(2), pages 139-154, June.

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