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An overview of forest and land allocation policies in Indonesia: Is the current framework sufficient to meet the needs of REDD+?

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  • Brockhaus, Maria
  • Obidzinski, Krystof
  • Dermawan, Ahmad
  • Laumonier, Yves
  • Luttrell, Cecilia

Abstract

The global community is negotiating an international REDD+ mechanism, and recent multilateral and bilateral arrangements indicate Indonesia may receive a significant share of financial resources attached to this mechanism. These financial incentives may potentially alter the country's economic landscape. However, current forest and land allocation policies and politics support economic activities that promote the exploitation of forest assets. More recently, global needs for energy and food have increased pressure on forest land. The REDD+ mechanism is designed to reverse this situation and create opportunities for necessary reforms both inside and outside the forestry sector. In this paper, we take a political economy perspective to analyze Indonesia's policies on the allocation of forest land (kawasan hutan) and, related to this, assess the changes in forest land allocation that are needed to enable REDD+ to compete with other sectors. This paper shows that there are numerous challenges to create a “space” for REDD+, many of which are rooted in the political economy of forests that shapes the nature and process of the land allocation system. The questions of where, on which type of forest land, at what scale and based on which procedures remain key for REDD+ and its capability to compete with other objectives within the current forest land allocation framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Brockhaus, Maria & Obidzinski, Krystof & Dermawan, Ahmad & Laumonier, Yves & Luttrell, Cecilia, 2012. "An overview of forest and land allocation policies in Indonesia: Is the current framework sufficient to meet the needs of REDD+?," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 30-37.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:forpol:v:18:y:2012:i:c:p:30-37
    DOI: 10.1016/j.forpol.2011.09.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christopher Adam & Stefan Dercon, 2009. "The political economy of development: an assessment," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(2), pages 173-189, Summer.
    2. von Braun, Joachim & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela, 2009. ""Land grabbing" by foreign investors in developing countries: Risks and opportunities," Policy briefs 13, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Colin Hunt, 2010. "The costs of reducing deforestation in Indonesia," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 187-192.
    4. Adam Schwarz, 2010. "Low carbon growth in Indonesia," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 181-185.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:jrpoli:v:54:y:2017:i:c:p:97-108 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Krott, Max & Bader, Axel & Schusser, Carsten & Devkota, Rosan & Maryudi, Ahmad & Giessen, Lukas & Aurenhammer, Helene, 2014. "Actor-centred power: The driving force in decentralised community based forest governance," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 34-42.
    3. Cacho, Oscar J. & Milne, Sarah & Gonzalez, Ricardo & Tacconi, Luca, 2014. "Benefits and costs of deforestation by smallholders: Implications for forest conservation and climate policy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 321-332.
    4. Fischer, Richard & Hargita, Yvonne & Günter, Sven, 2016. "Insights from the ground level? A content analysis review of multi-national REDD+ studies since 2010," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 47-58.
    5. repec:eee:forpol:v:85:y:2017:i:p1:p:10-21 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:spr:ieaple:v:17:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10784-016-9341-x is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Patrick Doupe, 2014. "Reduced Deforestation and Economic Growth," CCEP Working Papers 1402, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    8. Szulecka, Julia & Obidzinski, Krystof & Dermawan, Ahmad, 2016. "Corporate–society engagement in plantation forestry in Indonesia: Evolving approaches and their implications," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 19-29.
    9. Brockhaus, Maria & Di Gregorio, Monica & Mardiah, Sofi, 2014. "Governing the design of national REDD+: An analysis of the power of agency," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 23-33.
    10. Sahide, Muhammad Alif K. & Maryudi, Ahmad & Supratman, Supratman & Giessen, Lukas, 2016. "Is Indonesia utilising its international partners? The driving forces behind Forest Management Units," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 11-20.
    11. Doupe, Patrick, 2014. "Reduced deforestation and economic growth," Working Papers 249421, Australian National University, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy.
    12. Maryudi, Ahmad & Citraningtyas, Erlita R. & Purwanto, Ris H. & Sadono, Ronggo & Suryanto, Priyono & Riyanto, Slamet & Siswoko, Bowo D., 2016. "The emerging power of peasant farmers in the tenurial conflicts over the uses of state forestland in Central Java, Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 70-75.
    13. Prabowo, Doni & Maryudi, Ahmad & Senawi, & Imron, Muhammad A., 2017. "Conversion of forests into oil palm plantations in West Kalimantan, Indonesia: Insights from actors' power and its dynamics," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 32-39.
    14. repec:eee:forpol:v:86:y:2018:i:c:p:4-12 is not listed on IDEAS

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