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Wilderness adventure therapy effects on the mental health of youth participants

Author

Listed:
  • Bowen, Daniel J.
  • Neill, James T.
  • Crisp, Simon J.R.

Abstract

Adventure therapy offers a prevention, early intervention, and treatment modality for people with behavioural, psychological, and psychosocial issues. It can appeal to youth-at-risk who are often less responsive to traditional psychotherapeutic interventions. This study evaluated Wilderness Adventure Therapy (WAT) outcomes based on participants’ pre-program, post-program, and follow-up responses to self-report questionnaires. The sample consisted of 36 adolescent out-patients with mixed mental health issues who completed a 10-week, manualised WAT intervention. The overall short-term standardised mean effect size was small, positive, and statistically significant (0.26), with moderate, statistically significant improvements in psychological resilience and social self-esteem. Total short-term effects were within age-based adventure therapy meta-analytic benchmark 90% confidence intervals, except for the change in suicidality which was lower than the comparable benchmark. The short-term changes were retained at the three-month follow-up, except for family functioning (significant reduction) and suicidality (significant improvement). For participants in clinical ranges pre-program, there was a large, statistically significant reduction in depressive symptomology, and large to very large, statistically significant improvements in behavioural and emotional functioning. These changes were retained at the three-month follow-up. These findings indicate that WAT is as effective as traditional psychotherapy techniques for clinically symptomatic people. Future research utilising a comparison or wait-list control group, multiple sources of data, and a larger sample, could help to qualify and extend these findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Bowen, Daniel J. & Neill, James T. & Crisp, Simon J.R., 2016. "Wilderness adventure therapy effects on the mental health of youth participants," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 49-59.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:epplan:v:58:y:2016:i:c:p:49-59
    DOI: 10.1016/j.evalprogplan.2016.05.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Knorth, Erik J. & Harder, Annemiek T. & Zandberg, Tjalling & Kendrick, Andrew J., 2008. "Under one roof: A review and selective meta-analysis on the outcomes of residential child and youth care," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 123-140, February.
    2. Özabac?, Nilüfer, 2011. "Cognitive behavioural therapy for violent behaviour in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1989-1993, October.
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