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Differences in perceived living group climate between youth with a Turkish/Moroccan and native Dutch background in residential youth care

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  • Sevilir, R.
  • van der Helm, G.H.P.
  • Roest, J.J.
  • Beld, M.H.M.
  • Didden, R.

Abstract

There is increasing evidence for the importance of a positive living group climate in residential youth care with regard to treatment and recovery. However, cultural differences in perceived group climate and in particular the experiences of the group climate among youth with Turkish/Moroccan background have not been investigated yet. The main objective of this study was to examine differences in experience of living group climate between native Dutch youth and Turkish/Moroccan youth. The sample consisted of 437 youth (age M = 15.44, SD = 1.47) with a native Dutch background (80.3%) or a Turkish/Moroccan ethnical background (19.7%) living in Dutch residential youth care institutions. Data were collected using the Group Climate Instrument. Results indicated that Turkish/Moroccan youth experienced less support by group workers compared to native Dutch youth. These findings imply that professional caregivers working with youth with a different ethnical background should be sensitive to cultural differences in order to be responsive to their needs.

Suggested Citation

  • Sevilir, R. & van der Helm, G.H.P. & Roest, J.J. & Beld, M.H.M. & Didden, R., 2020. "Differences in perceived living group climate between youth with a Turkish/Moroccan and native Dutch background in residential youth care," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 114(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:114:y:2020:i:c:s0190740919313489
    DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105081
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