IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/energy/v29y2004i9p1561-1570.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Developing a set of regulatory analogs for carbon sequestration

Author

Listed:
  • Reiner, D.M
  • Herzog, H.J

Abstract

Carbon capture and sequestration will require the management and storage of carbon dioxide either in geological reservoirs or in the ocean over many centuries. While the possibility of exposure leading to damages to public health, workers or the environment may be small, if there is to be widespread adoption of sequestration, then a regulatory system will need to evolve to manage the reservoirs. To better understand the drivers of a future regulatory system, the historical evolution of comparable regulatory regimes provides a useful guide when viewed through the lens of public goods problems. Other long-term storage problems that have at least some of the characteristics of carbon storage are evaluated according to the nature of risk, the credibility of the solutions, the regulatory environment and the potential to either borrow from or influence other policy problems across geographic or issue boundaries. Though none are exact analogs, as a whole, the set offers variation in key variables critical for determining the success of carbon sequestration as a viable climate policy option.

Suggested Citation

  • Reiner, D.M & Herzog, H.J, 2004. "Developing a set of regulatory analogs for carbon sequestration," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 29(9), pages 1561-1570.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:energy:v:29:y:2004:i:9:p:1561-1570
    DOI: 10.1016/j.energy.2004.03.093
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0360544204001409
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Rehdanz, Katrin & Tol, Richard S.J. & Wetzel, Patrick, 2006. "Ocean carbon sinks and international climate policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(18), pages 3516-3526, December.
    2. Watson, Jim & Kern, Florian & Markusson, Nils, 2014. "Resolving or managing uncertainties for carbon capture and storage: Lessons from historical analogues," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 192-204.
    3. Wu, X.D. & Yang, Q. & Chen, G.Q. & Hayat, T. & Alsaedi, A., 2016. "Progress and prospect of CCS in China: Using learning curve to assess the cost-viability of a 2×600MW retrofitted oxyfuel power plant as a case study," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 1274-1285.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:energy:v:29:y:2004:i:9:p:1561-1570. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/energy .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.