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Aggregation bias in the economic model of crime

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  • Cherry, Todd L.
  • List, John A.

Abstract

This paper uses county-level panel data to test the appropriateness of the 'one size fits all' reduced-form regression approach commonly used when estimating the economic model of crime. Empirical results provide initial evidence that previous studies, which restrict deterrent effects to have identical impacts across crime types, may be presenting statistically biased results.
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Suggested Citation

  • Cherry, Todd L. & List, John A., 2002. "Aggregation bias in the economic model of crime," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 81-86, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:75:y:2002:i:1:p:81-86
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Kenneth L. Avio & C. Scott Clark, 1978. "The Supply of Property Offences in Ontario: Evidence on the Deterrent Effect of Punishment," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 11(1), pages 1-19, February.
    3. Cornwell, Christopher & Trumbull, William N, 1994. "Estimating the Economic Model of Crime with Panel Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(2), pages 360-366, May.
    4. Mathur, Vijay K, 1978. "Economics of Crime: An Investigation of the Deterrent Hypothesis for Urban Areas," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(3), pages 459-466, August.
    5. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    6. Sjoquist, David Lawrence, 1973. "Property Crime and Economic Behavior: Some Empirical Results," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(3), pages 439-446, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Zuzana Janko & Gurleen Popli, 2015. "Examining the link between crime and unemployment: a time-series analysis for Canada," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(37), pages 4007-4019, August.
    2. Entorf, Horst, 2007. "Evaluation des Maßregelvollzugs: Grundzüge einer Kosten-Nutzen-Analyse," Darmstadt Discussion Papers in Economics 183, Darmstadt University of Technology, Department of Law and Economics.
    3. George Saridakis, 2004. "Violent Crime in the United States of America: A Time-Series Analysis Between 1960–2000," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 203-221, September.
    4. Mojtaba Ghasemi, 2017. "Crime and punishment: evidence from dynamic panel data model for North Carolina (2003–2012)," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 723-730, March.
    5. IWAMOTO Koichiro, 2011. "Food Consumption Expenditure and Habit Formation: Evidence from Japanese Household Panel Data," ESRI Discussion paper series 264, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    6. Simon Planells Struse & Daniel Montolio, 2014. "The effect of football matches on crime patterns in Barcelona," ERSA conference papers ersa14p1606, European Regional Science Association.
    7. M. Caridad Araujo & Pedro Carneiro & Yyannú Cruz-Aguayo & Norbert Schady, 2016. "Teacher Quality and Learning Outcomes in Kindergarten," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 1415-1453.
    8. Montolio, Daniel & Planells-Struse, Simón, 2016. "How time shapes crime: The temporal impacts of football matches on crime," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 99-113.
    9. McIntyre, Stuart G. & Lacombe, Donald J., 2012. "Personal Indebtedness, Spatial Effects and Crime," SIRE Discussion Papers 2012-83, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    10. Cerro, Ana María & Rodríguez Andrés, Antonio, 2011. "Typologies of Crime in the Argentine Provinces. A Panel Study 2000-2008," MPRA Paper 44460, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Kinne, Jan & Resch, Bernd, 2017. "Analysing and predicting micro-location patterns of software firms," ZEW Discussion Papers 17-063, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    12. Neil Rickman & Robert Witt, 2007. "The Determinants of Employee Crime in the UK," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(293), pages 161-175, February.
    13. Piraee Khosrow & Barzegar Maryam, 2011. "The Relationship between the Misery Index and Crimes: Evidence from Iran," Asian Journal of Law and Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-21, April.
    14. Daniel Montolio & Simón Planells-Struse, 2015. "Measuring the negative externalities of a private leisure activity: hooligans and pickpockets around the stadium," Working Papers 2015/15, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    15. Garrett, Thomas A., 2003. "Aggregated versus disaggregated data in regression analysis: implications for inference," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 61-65, October.
    16. Jose Miguel Benavente & Javier Turen, 2012. "Identifying the determinants of crime occurrence and the deterring impact of police: Evidence across Chilean households," Working Papers wp348, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
    17. Maria Cracolici & Teodora Uberti, 2009. "Geographical distribution of crime in Italian provinces: a spatial econometric analysis," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 29(1), pages 1-28, February.
    18. Daniel Montolio & Simón Planells, 2013. "Does tourism boost criminal activity? Evidence from a top touristic country," Working Papers 2013/4, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    19. McIntyre, Stuart G. & Lacombe, Donald J., 2012. "Personal indebtedness, spatial effects and crime," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 455-459.
    20. Paolo Buonanno & Daniel Montolio Estivill, 2005. "Identifying the Socioeconomic Determinants of Crime in Spanish Provinces," Working Papers in Economics 138, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    21. Buonanno, Paolo & Leonida, Leone, 2009. "Non-market effects of education on crime: Evidence from Italian regions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 11-17, February.
    22. Kwabena Gyimah-Brempong & Jeffrey Racine, 2006. "Alcohol availability and crime: a robust approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(11), pages 1293-1307.
    23. Thomas A. Garrett, 2002. "Aggregated vs. disaggregated data in regression analysis: implications for inference," Working Papers 2002-024, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    24. Buonanno, Paolo & Montolio, Daniel, 2008. "Identifying the socio-economic and demographic determinants of crime across Spanish provinces," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 89-97, June.

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