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Democracy and growth in Africa: Implications of increasing electoral competitiveness

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  • FOSU, Augustin Kwasi

Abstract

Estimating a 1975-2004 decadal panel data in an augmented production-function framework, the paper finds that indexes of electoral competitiveness exhibit U-shape relationships with GDP growth, implying quite different "intermediate" and "advanced"-level effects of reforms in Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • FOSU, Augustin Kwasi, 2008. "Democracy and growth in Africa: Implications of increasing electoral competitiveness," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 100(3), pages 442-444, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:100:y:2008:i:3:p:442-444
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barry P. Bosworth & Susan M. Collins, 2003. "The Empirics of Growth: An Update," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 34(2), pages 113-206.
    2. Adam Przeworski & Fernando Limongi, 1993. "Political Regimes and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 51-69, Summer.
    3. Janvier D. Nkurunziza & Robert H. Bates, 2003. "Political Institutions and Economic Growth in Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2003-03, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    4. Fosu, A. K., 2001. "Political instability and economic growth in developing economies: some specification empirics," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 289-294, February.
    5. Block, Steven A., 2002. "Political business cycles, democratization, and economic reform: the case of Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 205-228, February.
    6. Robert H. Bates, 2006. "Institutions and Development," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(1), pages 10-61, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Augustin Kwasi Fosu, 2013. "Growth of African Economies: Productivity, Policy Syndromes and the Importance of Institutions," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(4), pages 523-551, August.
    2. Augustin Kwasi Fosu, 2010. "The Global Financial Crisis and Development: Whither Africa?," WIDER Working Paper Series 124, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Asiedu, Elizabeth & Lien, Donald, 2011. "Democracy, foreign direct investment and natural resources," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 99-111, May.
    4. Gregory N. Price & Juliet U. Elu, 2014. "Does regional currency integration ameliorate global macroeconomic shocks in sub-Saharan Africa? The case of the 2008-2009 global financial crisis," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 41(5), pages 737-750, September.
    5. John Ssozi & Simplice A. Asongu, 2016. "The Effects of Remittances on Output per Worker in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Production Function Approach," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 84(3), pages 400-421, September.
    6. Wumi Olayiwola & Henry Okodua & Evans S. Osabuohien, 2014. "Finance For Growth and Policy Options for Emerging and Developing Economies: The Case of Nigeria," Asian Development Policy Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 2(2), pages 20-38, June.
    7. Juliet Elu & Gregory Price, 2013. "Ethnicity as a Barrier to Childhood and Adolescent Health Capital in Tanzania: Evidence from the Wage-Height Relationship," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 25(1), pages 1-13.
    8. Mina Baliamoune, 2009. "Elites, Education and Reforms," ICER Working Papers 18-2009, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
    9. King, Alan & Ramlogan-Dobson, Carlyn, 2015. "Is Africa Actually Developing?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 598-613.
    10. Enowbi Batuo, Michael & Fabro, Gema, 2009. "Economic Development, Institutional Quality and Regional integration: Evidence from Africa Countries," MPRA Paper 19069, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Green, Alan, 2013. "Estimating the effects of democratization in African countries: A simultaneous equations approach," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 555-571.
    12. Augustin Kwasi Fosu, 2011. "Terms of Trade and Growth of Resource Economies: A Tale of Two Countries," CSAE Working Paper Series 2011-09, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    13. Adom, Philip Kofi, 2016. "The DDT Effect: The case of Economic Growth, Public Debt and Democracy Relationship," MPRA Paper 75022, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 11 Nov 2016.
    14. Kjell Hausken & Mthuli Ncube, 2016. "How Elections are Impacted by Production, Economic Growth and Conflict," International Game Theory Review (IGTR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 18(01), pages 1-29, March.
    15. Augustin Kwasi Fosu, 2013. "Growth of African Economies: Productivity, Policy Syndromes and the Importance of Institutions," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(4), pages 523-551, August.

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