IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ecoedu/v27y2008i6p646-654.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Course scheduling and academic performance

Author

Listed:
  • Dills, Angela K.
  • Hernández-Julián, Rey

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between course scheduling and student achievement, controlling for student and course characteristics. The literature in psychology recognizes that performance varies by time of day and that spacing learning out over time may foster greater long-term memory of items. We use student grades as a measure of performance and find a small, positive time of day effect partly driven by student selection into preferred course times. In addition, we find that students earn higher grades in classes that meet more often.

Suggested Citation

  • Dills, Angela K. & Hernández-Julián, Rey, 2008. "Course scheduling and academic performance," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 646-654, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:27:y:2008:i:6:p:646-654
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272-7757(07)00095-7
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hughes, Woodrow Jr, 2004. "Blocking student performance in high school?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 663-667, December.
    2. Eric P. Bettinger & Bridget Terry Long, 2010. "Does Cheaper Mean Better? The Impact of Using Adjunct Instructors on Student Outcomes," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(3), pages 598-613, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Cortes, Kalena E. & Bricker, Jesse & Rohlfs, Chris, 2010. "The Role of Specific Subjects in Education Production Functions: Evidence from Morning Classes in Chicago Public High Schools," IZA Discussion Papers 5031, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Groen, Jeffrey A. & Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff, 2017. "Snooze or Lose: High School Start Times and Academic Achievement," IZA Discussion Papers 11166, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. repec:spr:reihed:v:59:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s11162-017-9478-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:33:p:3341-3350 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Wang, Kurt & Sabia, Joseph J. & Cesur, Resul, 2016. "Sleepwalking through School: New Evidence on Sleep and Academic Performance," IZA Discussion Papers 9829, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:56:y:2018:i:1:p:304-316 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Cortes Kalena E. & Bricker Jesse & Rohlfs Chris, 2012. "The Role of Specific Subjects in Education Production Functions: Evidence from Morning Classes in Chicago Public High Schools," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-36, June.
    8. Scott E. Carrell & Teny Maghakian & James E. West, 2011. "A's from Zzzz's? The Causal Effect of School Start Time on the Academic Achievement of Adolescents," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 62-81, August.
    9. repec:bla:coecpo:v:35:y:2017:i:2:p:331-344 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:dew:wpaper:2016-01 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Timothy M. Diette & Manu Raghav, 2017. "Does early bird catch the worm or a lower GPA? Evidence from a liberal arts college," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(33), pages 3341-3350, July.
    12. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:62:y:2018:i:c:p:12-15 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Wayne A Grove x & Stephen Wu, 2011. "Factors Influencing Student Performance in Economics: Class and Instructor Characteristics," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 33 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    14. Kareem Haggag & Richard W. Patterson & Nolan G. Pope & Aaron Feudo, 2018. "Attribution Bias in Major Decisions: Evidence from the United States Military Academy," CESifo Working Paper Series 7081, CESifo Group Munich.
    15. Goulas, Sofoklis & Megalokonomou, Rigissa, 2018. "Marathon, Hurdling or Sprint? The Effects of Exam Scheduling on Academic Performance," IZA Discussion Papers 11624, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    16. Teny Maghakian Shapiro, 2015. "The educational effects of school start times," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 181-181, August.
    17. repec:kap:iaecre:v:24:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11294-018-9680-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Edwards, Finley, 2012. "Early to rise? The effect of daily start times on academic performance," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 970-983.
    19. Haggag, Kareem & Patterson, Richard & Pope, Nolan G. & Feudo, Aaron, 2019. "Attribution Bias in Major Decisions: Evidence from the United States Military Academy," IZA Discussion Papers 12174, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    20. Timothy M. Diette & Manu Raghav, 2016. "Longer Classes Versus More Frequent Classes: Which Wins? Evidence from a Liberal Arts College," Working Papers 2016-03, DePauw University, Department of Economics and Management.
    21. Jesse Bricker & Kalena E. Cortes & Chris Rohlfs, 2010. "The role of specific subjects in education production functions: evidence from morning classes in Chicago public high schools," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2010-33, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    22. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:67:y:2018:i:c:p:158-170 is not listed on IDEAS

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:27:y:2008:i:6:p:646-654. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.