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Globalisation and cointegration among the states and convergence across the continents: A panel data analysis

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  • Utpal Kumar De

Abstract

This paper attempts to examine the level of cointegration among various nations across continents with respect to their globalisation. An approach is also made to analyse the nature of inter- and intra-continental globalisation and its variation over time. The proximity and convergence over time, in terms of the growth of globalisation is examined by using a panel data set over a period from 1970 to 2007. The outcome reveals the presence of co-integration among selected nations. The European nations are more co-integrated than those in other continents. They are closely followed by the countries in Africa and Asia. The proximity matrices of overall globalisation and political globalisation provide some important indications that geographical proximity, economic necessities, cultural and political understanding play a crucial role in determining the clusters of countries in terms of globalisation.

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  • Utpal Kumar De, 2014. "Globalisation and cointegration among the states and convergence across the continents: A panel data analysis," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 107-121.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecanpo:v:44:y:2014:i:1:p:107-121
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    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2015. "The Evidence on Globalisation," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(3), pages 509-552, March.
    2. Chang, Chun-Ping & Lee, Chien-Chiang & Hsieh, Meng-Chi, 2015. "Does globalization promote real output? Evidence from quantile cointegration regression," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 25-36.
    3. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2017. "The Globalization and Peace Nexus: Findings Using Two Composite Indices," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 871-885, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism
    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • C82 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Macroeconomic Data; Data Access
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies

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