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The regional demand for energy by the residential sector in the United States

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  • Uri, Noel D.

Abstract

The residential sector is a substantial consumer of energy in the United States. The heterogeneous composition of the sector complicates modelling the demand for energy. After reflecting the particular nuances introduced by differing thermal characteristics of the various fuels, one finds an income elasticity slightly in excess of unity and a price elasticity of demand of approximately -0·35. The results are not inconsistent with other studies done for the United States. A translog fuel share model yields some significant and interesting conclusions. Support is lent to the contention that consumers are responding to the relative changes in fuel prices by altering their energy consumption patterns. Finally, the question of stability is addressed. The results are conclusive suggesting that the demand for natural gas, oil and electrical energy have remained cirtually constant over the past three decades.

Suggested Citation

  • Uri, Noel D., 1983. "The regional demand for energy by the residential sector in the United States," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 23-44, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:appene:v:13:y:1983:i:1:p:23-44
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    Cited by:

    1. Copiello, Sergio & Grillenzoni, Carlo, 2017. "Is the cold the only reason why we heat our homes? Empirical evidence from spatial series data," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 193(C), pages 491-506.
    2. Krauss, Alexander, 2016. "How natural gas tariff increases can influence poverty: Results, measurement constraints and bias," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 244-254.
    3. Theodoridou, Ifigeneia & Karteris, Marinos & Mallinis, Georgios & Papadopoulos, Agis M. & Hegger, Manfred, 2012. "Assessment of retrofitting measures and solar systems' potential in urban areas using Geographical Information Systems: Application to a Mediterranean city," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(8), pages 6239-6261.
    4. Fan, Jing-Li & Liao, Hua & Liang, Qiao-Mei & Tatano, Hirokazu & Liu, Chun-Feng & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2013. "Residential carbon emission evolutions in urban–rural divided China: An end-use and behavior analysis," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 323-332.
    5. Dagher, Leila, 2012. "Natural gas demand at the utility level: An application of dynamic elasticities," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 961-969.

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