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Determinants of agriculture's relative decline: Thailand

  • Martin, Will J.
  • Warr, Peter G.

During economic development, agriculture declines as a proportion of aggregate national output. A number of theoretical explanations for this phenomenon have been advanced in the economic literature, but their relative historical significance has not been clear. This paper develops an econometric methodology to analyze this issue and applies it to time series data for Thailand. The study investigates the importance of relative commodity prices, factor endowments and technical progress as explanations for changing sectoral GDP shares of agriculture, manufacturing and services. It is concluded that the movement in Thailand's aggregate factor endowment relative to labor was the most important determinant of agriculture's relative decline.

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Article provided by Blackwell in its journal Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 11 (1994)
Issue (Month): 2-3 (December)
Pages: 219-235

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Handle: RePEc:eee:agecon:v:11:y:1994:i:2-3:p:219-235
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  1. Cavallo, Domingo & Mundlak, Yair, 1982. "Agriculture and economic growth in an open economy: the case of Argentina," Research reports 36, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Irving B. Kravis & Robert E. Lipsey, 1988. "National Price Levels and the Prices of Tradables and Nontradables," NBER Working Papers 2536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Mundlak, Yair, 1979. "Intersectoral factor mobility and agricultural growth:," Research reports 6, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Engle, Robert F & Granger, Clive W J, 1987. "Co-integration and Error Correction: Representation, Estimation, and Testing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 251-76, March.
  5. Anderson, Kym, 1987. "On Why Agriculture Declines with Economic Growth," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 1(3), October.
  6. W. Erwin Diewert & T.J. Wales, 1989. "Flexible Functional Forms and Global Curvature Conditions," NBER Technical Working Papers 0040, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Denis Lawrence, 1989. "An Aggregator Model of Canadian Export Supply and Import Demand Responsiveness," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 22(3), pages 503-21, August.
  8. Beggs, John J, 1988. "Diagnostic Testing in Applied Econometrics," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 64(185), pages 81-101, June.
  9. Lopez, Ramon E, 1985. "Structural Implications of a Class of Flexible Functional Forms for Profit Functions," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 26(3), pages 593-601, October.
  10. Leamer, Edward E, 1987. "Paths of Development in the Three-Factor, n-Good General Equilibrium Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(5), pages 961-99, October.
  11. Falvey, Rodney E & Gemmell, Norman, 1991. "Explaining Service-Price Differences in International Comparisons," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1295-309, December.
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