IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ecj/econjl/v112y2002i6p504-538.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Effect Of Individual Retirement Accounts On Household Consumption And National Saving

Author

Listed:
  • Orazio P. Attanasio

    (University College London, IFS, and NBER)

  • Thomas DeLeire

    (University of Chicago)

Abstract

A major debate exists on whether expanding tax--favoured savings accounts such as Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) will increase national savings. Much of the empirical debate has centred on whether IRA contributions before the Tax Reform Act of 1986 represented new savings or merely reshuffled assets. We find no evidence that households financed their IRA contributions from reductions in consumption, at least initially. We find evidence that households financed their IRA contributions from existing savings or from saving that would have been done anyway. Our results indicate that, at most, 9% of IRA contributions represented net additions to national saving. Copyright 2002 Royal Economic Society

Suggested Citation

  • Orazio P. Attanasio & Thomas DeLeire, 2002. "The Effect Of Individual Retirement Accounts On Household Consumption And National Saving," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(6), pages 504-538, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:112:y:2002:i:6:p:504-538
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=synergy&synergyAction=showTOC&journalCode=ecoj&volume=112&issue=6&year=2002&part=null
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James Banks & Sarah Smith, 1996. "Savings and wealth in the UK: evidence from micro-data," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 17(2), pages 37-64, January.
    2. B. Douglas Bernheim, 1996. "Rethinking Saving Incentives," Working Papers 96009, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    3. Burman, Leonard E. & Cordes, Joseph J. & Ozanne, Larry, 1990. "IRAs and National Savings," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 43(3), pages 259-283, September.
    4. Burman, Leonard E. & Cordes, Joseph J. & Ozanne, Larry, 1990. "IRAs and National Savings," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 43(3), pages 259-83, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Monica Paiella & Andrea Tiseno, 2009. "Saving for retirement and retirement investment choices," Discussion Papers 1_2009, D.E.S. (Department of Economic Studies), University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    2. Kitao, Sagiri, 2010. "Individual Retirement Accounts, saving and labor supply," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 108(2), pages 197-200, August.
    3. Nishiyama, Shinichi, 2011. "The budgetary and welfare effects of tax-deferred retirement saving accounts," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(11), pages 1561-1578.
    4. Jarkko Harju, 2013. "Voluntary Pension Savings and Tax Incentives: Evidence from Finland," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 69(1), pages 3-29, March.
    5. Juan Ayuso & Juan F. Jimeno & Ernesto Villanueva, 2007. "The effects of the introduction of tax incentives on retirement savings," Working Papers 0724, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    6. Axel Börsch-Supan & Tabea Bucher-Koenen & Michela Coppola & Bettina Lamla, 2015. "Savings In Times Of Demographic Change: Lessons From The German Experience," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(4), pages 807-829, September.
    7. Immacolata Marino & Filippo Pericoli & Luigi Ventura, 2011. "Tax Incentives and Household Investment in Complementary Pension Insurance: Some Recent Evidence From the Italian Experience," Risk Management and Insurance Review, American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 14(2), pages 247-263, September.
    8. Armstrong, Angus & Davis, Philip & Ebell, Monique, 2015. "An economic analysis of pension tax proposals," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86276, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Hans Fehr & Christian Habermann, 2010. "Private retirement savings and mandatory annuitization," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 17(6), pages 640-661, December.
    10. Adam M. Lavecchia, 2018. "Do "Catch-Up Limits" Raise Retirement Saving? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 71(1), pages 121-154, March.
    11. Dmitry Kulikov & Karsten Staehr, "undated". "Microeconometric analysis of household saving in Estonia: income, wealth, financial exposure," Bank of Estonia Working Papers wp2007-8, Bank of Estonia, revised 03 Feb 2015.
    12. Alexander M. Gelber, 2011. "How Do 401(k)s Affect Saving? Evidence from Changes in 401(k) Eligibility," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 103-122, November.
    13. Hans Fehr & Christian Habermann, 2008. "Private Retirement Savings in Germany: The Structure of Tax Incentives and Annuitization," CESifo Working Paper Series 2238, CESifo Group Munich.
    14. Martin Jacob, 2013. "Capital Gains Taxes and the Realization of Capital Gains and Losses - Evidence from German Income Tax Data," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 69(1), pages 30-56, March.
    15. Rowena Crawford & Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson, 2012. "Do up-front tax incentives affect private pension saving in the United Kingdom?," IFS Working Papers W12/05, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    16. Monique Ebell & Angus Armstrong & Philip Davis, 2015. "An economic analysis of the existing taxation of pensions (EET) versus an alternative regime (TEE)," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 455, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    17. Börsch-Supan, Axel & Bucher-Koenen, Tabea & Goll, Nicolas & Maier, Christina, 2016. "15 Jahre Riester - eine Bilanz," Working Papers 12/2016, German Council of Economic Experts / Sachverständigenrat zur Begutachtung der gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung.
    18. Hans Fehr & Christian Habermann & Fabian Kindermann, 2008. "Tax-Favored Retirement Accounts: Are they Efficient in Increasing Savings and Growth?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 64(2), pages 171-198, June.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:112:y:2002:i:6:p:504-538. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/resssea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.