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Kicking the Habit: Moving from Pegged Rates to Greater Exchange Rate Flexibility

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  • Eichengreen, Barry

Abstract

Why do governments find it so difficult to move from pegged exchange rates to greater exchange rate flexibility? The author first establishes that there is a problem to be solved: that there are powerful incentives for greater flexibility deriving from changes in the international economic and financial environment but that policymakers find it difficult to engineer a smooth transition. He offers practical suggestions and a framework under which the probability of a smooth transition can be maximized. Drawing examples from recent economic history, the author then attempts to understand the experience of selected countries that have undertaken this transition.

Suggested Citation

  • Eichengreen, Barry, 1999. "Kicking the Habit: Moving from Pegged Rates to Greater Exchange Rate Flexibility," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(454), pages 1-14, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:109:y:1999:i:454:p:c1-14
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    Cited by:

    1. Ramkishen S. Rajan & Rahul Sen & Reza Y. Siregar, 2002. "Hong Kong, Singapore and the East Asian Crisis: How Important were Trade Spillovers?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(4), pages 503-537, April.
    2. Terence Tai-Leung Chong & Qing He & Wing Hong Chan, 2016. "From Fixed to Float: A Competing Risks Analysis," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(4), pages 488-503, October.
    3. Joshua Aizenman & Reuven Glick, 2008. "Pegged Exchange Rate Regimes-A Trap?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(4), pages 817-835, June.
    4. Joshua Aizenman & Reuven Glick, 2009. "Sterilization, Monetary Policy, and Global Financial Integration," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(4), pages 777-801, September.
    5. Vittorio Corbo, 2002. "Monetary Policy in Latin America in the 90s," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Norman Loayza & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Series (ed.), Monetary Policy: Rules and Transmission Mechanisms, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 6, pages 117-166 Central Bank of Chile.
    6. Glick, Reuven & Hutchison, Michael, 2009. "Navigating the trilemma: Capital flows and monetary policy in China," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 205-224, May.
    7. Sheri M. Markose, 2005. "Computability and Evolutionary Complexity: Markets as Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS)," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(504), pages 159-192, 06.
    8. Michael Frömmel, 2010. "Volatility Regimes in Central and Eastern European Countries’ Exchange Rates," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 60(1), pages 2-21, February.
    9. repec:ibn:ijefaa:v:9:y:2017:i:7:p:69-85 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Már Guðmundsson & Thórarinn G. Pétursson & Arnór Sighvatsson, 2000. "Optimal Exchange Rate Policy: The Case of Iceland," Economics wp08, Department of Economics, Central bank of Iceland.
    11. Hua Cheng, 2005. "« Currency Board » versus change géré ? Un bilan des stratégies de Hong Kong et de Singapour," Revue d'Économie Financière, Programme National Persée, vol. 81(4), pages 271-289.
    12. Joshua Aizenman, 2008. "Large Hoarding Of International Reserves And The Emerging Global Economic Architecture," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 76(5), pages 487-503, September.
    13. Alejandro D Guerson, 2015. "Inflation Dynamics and Monetary Policy in Bolivia," IMF Working Papers 15/266, International Monetary Fund.
    14. Ghosh, Saibal, 2001. "Financial Stability and Public Policy: An Overview," MPRA Paper 19757, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Aizenman, Joshua & Glick, Reuven, 2005. "Pegged Exchange Rate Regimes – A Trap?," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt92n6v1rm, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
    16. Kawai, Masahiro & Takagi, Shinji, 2000. "Proposed strategy for a regional exchange rate arrangement in post-crisis East Asia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2503, The World Bank.
    17. Almukhtar Saif Al-Abri, 2014. "Labor Market Heterogeneity and Optimal Exchange Rate Regime in Resource-Rich MENA Countries," Working Papers 844, Economic Research Forum, revised Oct 2014.
    18. Venla Sipilä, 2002. "The Russian triple crisis 1998: currency, finance and budget," UCL SSEES Economics and Business working paper series 17, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES).

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