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Importing Credibility through Exchange Rate Pegging

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  • Herrendorf, Berthold

Abstract

This paper employs an optimal taxation framework in order to study the credibility of monetary policy-making in an open economy. Since inflation is, in part, uncontrollable due to stochastic disturbances, the authority's actions cannot be monitored perfectly when the exchange rate floats, thus implying that reputational forces may become ineffective. In contrast, pegging the nominal exchange rate to a low-inflation currency allows perfect monitoring because the exchange rate is, in principle, controllable. For this reason, exchange rate pegging may import credibility and result in the best reputational equilibrium, even though the authority retains the discretion to devalue unexpectedly. Copyright 1997 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Herrendorf, Berthold, 1997. "Importing Credibility through Exchange Rate Pegging," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(442), pages 687-694, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:107:y:1997:i:442:p:687-94
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:cuf:journl:y:2017:v:18:i:1:asab is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Alexandre Cunha, 2013. "On the relevance of floating exchange rate policies," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 53(2), pages 357-382, June.
    3. Andrew Atkeson & V. V. Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe, 2007. "On the Optimal Choice of a Monetary Policy Instrument," NBER Working Papers 13398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Herrendorf, Berthold, 1999. "Transparency, reputation, and credibility under floating and pegged exchange rates," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 31-50, October.
    5. Buigut, Steven & Valev, Neven T., 2009. "Benefits from Mutual Restraint in a Multilateral Monetary Union," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 585-594, March.
    6. J. Scott Davis & Ippei Fujiwara & Jiao Wang, 2017. "Dealing with time-inconsistency: Inflation targeting vs. exchange rate targeting," CAMA Working Papers 2017-54, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    7. Dal Bo, Ernesto, 2006. "Committees with supermajority voting yield commitment with flexibility," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(4-5), pages 573-599, May.
    8. Laubach, Thomas, 2003. "Signalling commitment with monetary and inflation targets," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(6), pages 985-1009, December.
    9. Marie-Noëlle Cales, 1999. "Les enjeux du rattachement des monnaies du Maghreb à l'euro," Revue d'Économie Financière, Programme National Persée, vol. 52(2), pages 147-161.
    10. Canavan, Chris & Tommasi, Mariano, 1997. "On the credibility of alternative exchange rate regimes," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 101-122, October.
    11. Andrés VELASCO, 2000. "Exchange-Rate Policies For Developing Countries: What Have We Learned? What Do We Still Not Know?," G-24 Discussion Papers 5, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.

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