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Insider-Outsider Theory and the Case for Implicit Contracts


  • Leslie, Derek


The purpose of this paper is to show that insider-outsider theory and implicit contracts are complementary rather than rival theories. Insider-outsider theory introduces some realistic institutional detail into implicit contracts, and insider-outsider theory is enriched by a more careful consideration of optimal wage contracts under conditions of uncertainty, which is the main comparative advantage of the implicit contract approach. The paper introduces a hybrid model and shows how the predictions of both approaches are modified. Copyright 1992 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Leslie, Derek, 1992. "Insider-Outsider Theory and the Case for Implicit Contracts," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(410), pages 37-48, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:102:y:1992:i:410:p:37-48

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kreps, David M & Wilson, Robert, 1982. "Sequential Equilibria," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 863-894, July.
    2. Persson, Torsten, 1988. "An introduction and a broad survey," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(2-3), pages 519-532, March.
    3. Milgrom, Paul & Roberts, John, 1986. "Price and Advertising Signals of Product Quality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(4), pages 796-821, August.
    4. In-Koo Cho & David M. Kreps, 1987. "Signaling Games and Stable Equilibria," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 102(2), pages 179-221.
    5. Rogoff, Kenneth, 1990. "Equilibrium Political Budget Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(1), pages 21-36, March.
    6. Helpman, Elhanan, 1988. "Macroeconomic Effects of Price Controls: The Role of Market Structure," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 98(391), pages 340-354, June.
    7. David Backus & John Driffill, 1985. "Rational Expectations and Policy Credibility Following a Change in Regime," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(2), pages 211-221.
    8. Rodrik, Dani, 1989. "Promises, Promises: Credible Policy Reform via Signalling," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(397), pages 756-772, September.
    9. Vickers, John, 1986. "Signalling in a Model of Monetary Policy with Incomplete Information," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(3), pages 443-455, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Schob, Ronnie & Wildasin, David E., 2007. "Economic integration and labor market institutions: Worker mobility, earnings risk, and contract structure," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 141-164, March.
    2. Franz, Wolfgang, 1993. "Unvollkommene Arbeitsmärkte in makroökonomischen Modellen: Eine Übersicht," Discussion Papers 1, University of Konstanz, Center for International Labor Economics (CILE).
    3. João R. Faria & Paulo R. A. Loureiro & Franklin G. Mixon & Adolfo Sachsida, 2016. "Minority Faculty Hiring Power in Academe: an Economic Model," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 43(3), pages 273-288, December.
    4. Fredriksson, Per G. & Gaston, Noel, 1999. "The "greening" of trade unions and the demand for eco-taxes," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 663-686, November.

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