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A note on race, ethnicity and nativity differentials in remarriage in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Catherine B. McNamee

    (University of Texas at Austin)

  • R. Kelly Raley

    (University of Texas at Austin)

Abstract

The objectives of this study are to produce up-to-date estimates of race/ethnic/nativity differentials for remarriage and repartnership among women in the United States and to see if these differences are due to across-group differences in demographic characteristics. First, we produce lifetable estimates of remarriage and repartnering for white, black, U.S. born Latina and foreign born Latina women. Next, we estimate race/ethnic/nativity differentials for remarriage and repartnership using event-history analysis with and without controls for demographic characteristics. The results suggest a continued overall decline in remarriage rates, while many women repartner by cohabitating. Whites are more likely than blacks or Latinas to remarry and they are also more likely to repartner. Race/ethnic/nativity differentials remain even after accounting for variations in demographic characteristics. This suggests that race/ethnic/nativity differentials in remarriage and repartnering rates, rather than ameliorating disadvantages associated with divorce, reinforce these differentials.

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine B. McNamee & R. Kelly Raley, 2011. "A note on race, ethnicity and nativity differentials in remarriage in the United States," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 24(13), pages 293-312, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:24:y:2011:i:13
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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol24/13/24-13.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Neil G. Bennett, 2017. "A reflection on the changing dynamics of union formation and dissolution," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(12), pages 371-390, January.
    2. Celia Lo & Tyrone Cheng & Gaynell Simpson, 2016. "Marital status and work-related health limitation: a longitudinal study of young adult and middle-aged Americans," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(1), pages 91-100, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cohabitation; divorce; ethnicity; nativity; remarriage;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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