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Circular migration patterns and determinants in Nairobi slum settlements

Author

Listed:
  • Donatien Beguy

    (United Nations Human Settlements (UN Habitat))

  • Philippe Bocquier

    (Université catholique de Louvain)

  • Eliya Msiyaphazi Zulu

    (African Institute for Development Policy (AFIDEP))

Abstract

This paper measures migration flows and determinants in two slum settlements in Nairobi City between 2003 and 2007. The results confirm the high intensity of migration with a quarter of the total slum population and a third of those aged 15-30 being renewed annually. A circular migration system is at play whereby the majority of slum dwellers are short-term migrants spending on average less than 3 years in the area. Migration is more intense during early adulthood (20-24), and despite very similar determinants across gender, mobility is more intense among women compared to men. The increasing feminization of migration is likely to change the face of slum settlements, resulting in more balanced sex ratios, in line with city-wide trends in Nairobi over the past half century. The high population turnover is due to the insecurity of livelihoods, tenure, and poor basic amenities and social services in slum settlements.

Suggested Citation

  • Donatien Beguy & Philippe Bocquier & Eliya Msiyaphazi Zulu, 2010. "Circular migration patterns and determinants in Nairobi slum settlements," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 23(20), pages 549-586, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:23:y:2010:i:20
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol23/20/23-20.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. FAYE Ousmane & ISLAM Nizamul & ZULU Eliya, 2011. "Poverty dynamics in Nairobi's slums: testing for true state dependence and heterogeneity effects," LISER Working Paper Series 2011-56, LISER.
    2. Sándor Illés, 2015. "Circulation of immigrants to Hungary," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 12(2), pages 152-161, May.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:4:p:1075-:d:139572 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Amelie F. Constant & Olga Nottmeyer & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2013. "The economics of circular migration," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 3, pages 55-74 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Camlin, Carol S. & Kwena, Zachary A. & Dworkin, Shari L. & Cohen, Craig R. & Bukusi, Elizabeth A., 2014. "“She mixes her business”: HIV transmission and acquisition risks among female migrants in western Kenya," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 146-156.
    6. Carren Ginsburg & Philippe Bocquier & Donatien Beguy & Sulaimon Afolabi & Orvalho Augusto & Karim Derra & Frank Odhiambo & Mark Otiende & Abdramane Soura & Pascal Zabré & Michael J. White & Mark Colli, 2016. "Human capital on the move: Education as a determinant of internal migration in selected INDEPTH surveillance populations in Africa," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(30), pages 845-884, May.
    7. Leonardo Becchetti & Pierluigi Conzo & Giacomo Degli Antoni, 2015. "Public disclosure of players’ conduct and common resources harvesting: experimental evidence from a Nairobi slum," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 45(1), pages 71-96, June.
    8. Archambault, Caroline S. & de Laat, Joost & Zulu, Eliya Msiyaphazi, 2012. "Urban Services and Child Migration to the Slums of Nairobi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(9), pages 1854-1869.
    9. Oyvat, Cem & wa Gĩthĩnji, Mwangi, 2017. "Migration in Kenya: beyond Harris-Todaro," Greenwich Papers in Political Economy 16226, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre.
    10. Amelie Constant & Klaus Zimmermann, 2011. "Circular and Repeat Migration: Counts of Exits and Years Away from the Host Country," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(4), pages 495-515, August.
    11. repec:eee:socmed:v:184:y:2017:i:c:p:27-39 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Arnold, Christine & Theede, Jason & Gagnon, Anita, 2014. "A qualitative exploration of access to urban migrant healthcare in Nairobi, Kenya," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 1-9.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; demographic surveillance system; event history analysis; internal migration; Nairobi; slum settlements;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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