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Men´s and women´s economic activity and first marriage: Jews in Israel, 1987-1995

Author

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  • Liat Raz-Yurovich

    (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Abstract

Using both analysis of the effect of lagged economic and current educational characteristics and analysis of life-course changes in these characteristics, this study provides insights into the theoretical debate concerning the relationships between men´s and women´s economic activity and transition to first marriage. Our findings support the men´s economic stability hypothesis, the search hypothesis and the income pooling hypothesis; and counter the women´s economic independence hypothesis, but only to a certain degree. For men, we find a positive effect of employment stability, and a positive effect of earnings, which increase over time. For women, the effect of the salary has an inverse U shape, and employment stability has positive effect on marriage. Over the life course, we find that men who have a continuum of stable employment have the highest odds of first marriage; while women reduce economic activity in anticipation of or due to marriage. Moreover, marriage is postponed for at least two years after educational accumulation is completed.

Suggested Citation

  • Liat Raz-Yurovich, 2010. "Men´s and women´s economic activity and first marriage: Jews in Israel, 1987-1995," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(29), pages 933-964, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:22:y:2010:i:29
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol22/29/22-29.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James Raymo, 2003. "Educational attainment and the transition to first marriage among Japanese women," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(1), pages 83-103, February.
    2. Becker, Gary S & Landes, Elisabeth M & Michael, Robert T, 1977. "An Economic Analysis of Marital Instability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(6), pages 1141-1187, December.
    3. Teresa Martin & Larry Bumpass, 1989. "Recent trends in marital disruption," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 26(1), pages 37-51, February.
    4. Sendhil Mullainathan & Marianne Bertrand, 2001. "Do People Mean What They Say? Implications for Subjective Survey Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 67-72, May.
    5. Jay Teachman, 2007. "Race, military service, and marital timing: Evidence from the NLSY-79," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(2), pages 389-404, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:poprpr:v:37:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11113-017-9444-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:wdevel:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:124-134 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; employment; event history analysis; income; Israel; life course analysis; longitudinal; marriage;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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