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Prospects for the Progress of Heterodox Economics

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  • Dow, Sheila C.

Abstract

What are the prospects for progress in heterodox economics? The question posed for this roundtable discussion raises a wide range of important issues, for heterodox economics and for economics as a whole. In order to clarify some of these issues, this contribution approaches the question from a practical point of view: what strategy would promote the progress of heterodox economics?

Suggested Citation

  • Dow, Sheila C., 2000. "Prospects for the Progress of Heterodox Economics," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(2), pages 157-170, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jhisec:v:22:y:2000:i:02:p:157-170_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Ioana Negru, 2013. "Revisiting the Concept of Schools of Thought in Economics: The Example of the Austrian School," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 72(4), pages 983-1008, October.
    2. Dawn Richards Elliott, 2009. "What is the Comparative Advantage of the Service Learning Pedagogy? Insights from Development Economics," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 38(2), pages 263-278, July.
    3. Sandra Silva, 2009. "On evolutionary technological change and economic growth: Lakatos as a starting point for appraisal," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 111-135, February.
    4. Karin Astrid Siegmann & Myriam Blin, 2006. "The Best Of Two Worlds: Between-Method Triangulation In Feminist Economics Research," Working Papers 146, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK.
    5. Dirk C. Moosmayer & Sandra Waddock & Long Wang & Matthias P. Hühn & Claus Dierksmeier & Christopher Gohl, 2019. "Leaving the Road to Abilene: A Pragmatic Approach to Addressing the Normative Paradox of Responsible Management Education," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 157(4), pages 913-932, July.
    6. Robert Lepenies, 2014. "Economists as political philosophers : a critique of normative trade theory," RSCAS Working Papers 2014/11, European University Institute.
    7. Andrew Mearman, 2008. "Rhetorical Dualism and the Orthodox/Heterdox Distinction in Economics," Working Papers 0802, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    8. Parada, Jairo, 2008. "Post-Keynesian Theory of Business Enterprise and the Veblenian´s Approach: Are there commonalities?," MPRA Paper 16768, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Jul 2008.
    9. Dawn Richards Elliott, 2009. "What is the Comparative Advantage of the Service Learning Pedagogy? Insights from Development Economics," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(2-3), pages 263-278, January.
    10. Óscar Carpintero, 2013. "When Heterodoxy Becomes Orthodoxy: Ecological Economics in The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 72(5), pages 1287-1314, November.
    11. Jairo Parada Corrales, 2008. "Post-keynesian micro theory on business enterprise and the veblenian´s aproach: ¿are there commonalities?," Revista de Economía del Caribe 007106, Universidad del Norte.
    12. Michele Di Maio, 2013. "Are Mainstream and Heterodox Economists Different? An Empirical Analysis," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 72(5), pages 1315-1348, November.

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