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Political responses to interdependence: what's “left” for the left?


  • Garrett, Geoffrey
  • Lange, Peter


Heightened economic interdependence in recent years is commonly argued to have generated great pressures for convergence in economic policies across the advanced industrial democracies. Interdependence has clearly had a great impact on the types of economic policies that governments can pursue: they have been unable to pursue independent fiscal and monetary policies since the mid-1970s. Furthermore, all governments have been forced to attempt to promote the competitiveness of national goods and services in world markets and to increase the speed and efficiency with which national producers adjust to changes in global markets. There are, however, different policies consistent with these goals. Statistical analyses of economic policies since the mid-1970s show that governments of the left and the right continue to be able to enact distinctive supply-side policies that promote competitiveness and flexible adjustment and simultaneously further their partisan objectives.

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  • Garrett, Geoffrey & Lange, Peter, 1991. "Political responses to interdependence: what's “left” for the left?," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 45(04), pages 539-564, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:intorg:v:45:y:1991:i:04:p:539-564_03

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Antoine Gervais & J. Bradford Jensen, 2013. "The Tradability of Services: Geographic Concentration and Trade Costs," NBER Working Papers 19759, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Alan S. Blinder & Alan B. Krueger, 2013. "Alternative Measures of Offshorability: A Survey Approach," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(S1), pages 97-128.
    3. Edward E. Leamer, 2007. "A Flat World, a Level Playing Field, a Small World After All, or None of the Above? A Review of Thomas L Friedman's The World is Flat," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(1), pages 83-126, March.
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    7. J. Bradford Jensen, 2011. "Global Trade in Services: Fear, Facts, and Offshoring," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 6017.
    8. Ron S Jarmin & Javier Miranda, 2002. "The Longitudinal Business Database," Working Papers 02-17, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Cusack, Thomas R., 1997. "Partisan politics and fiscal policy," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economic Change and Employment FS I 97-306, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    2. Culpepper, Pepper D., 2001. "Employers, Public Policy, and the Politics of Decentralized Cooperation in Germany and France," Working Paper Series rwp01-002, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    3. Thomas Bräuninger, 2005. "A partisan model of government expenditure," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 125(3), pages 409-429, December.
    4. Seeleib-Kaiser, Martin, 2001. "Ende oder Neubeginn der Sozialdemokratie," Working papers of the ZeS 16/2001, University of Bremen, Centre for Social Policy Research (ZeS).
    5. Patrick Lunz, 2013. "What's left of the left? Partisanship and the political economy of labour market reform: why has the social democratic party in Germany liberalised labour markets?," Europe in Question Discussion Paper Series of the London School of Economics (LEQs) 5, London School of Economics / European Institute.
    6. Ansell, Ben & Broz, Lawrence, 2015. "Global capital markets, housing prices, and partisan fiscal policies," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60930, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Camyar, Isa & Ulupinar, Bahar, 2013. "The partisan policy cycle and firm valuation," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 92-111.
    8. André Corrêa d’Almeida & Paulo Reis Mourão, "undated". "The Irrelevance of Political Parties’ Differences for Public Finances - Evidence from Public Deficit and Debt in Portugal (1974 – 2012) Abstract: This paper attempts to empirically test whether inter-," NIPE Working Papers 11/2015, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    9. Farrell Henry & Newman Abraham L., 2015. "Structuring power: business and authority beyond the nation state," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 17(3), pages 527-552, October.
    10. Stephen Weymouth & J. Lawrence Broz, 2013. "Government Partisanship and Property Rights: Cross-Country Firm-Level Evidence," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(2), pages 229-256, July.

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