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Market-Modelled Home Care in Ontario: Deteriorating Working Conditions and Dwindling Community Capacity

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  • Jane Aronson
  • Margaret Denton
  • Isik Zeytinoglu

Abstract

The closure of a non-profit, unionized home support agency in Hamilton in 2002 offers an illuminating case study of the local impacts of Ontario's contractual approach to home care. A survey of the 317 support workers who were laid off revealed that only 38 percent stayed in the home-care sector; most were absorbed by for-profit, non-unionized agencies where their employment conditions deteriorated. These findings are at odds with the long-established connection between quality of home-care employment and quality of home-care service. They have implications for developing criteria for dispersing public funds in mixed economies of community care, and for conceptualizing the capacity-building responsibilities of governments in their coordination.

Suggested Citation

  • Jane Aronson & Margaret Denton & Isik Zeytinoglu, 2004. "Market-Modelled Home Care in Ontario: Deteriorating Working Conditions and Dwindling Community Capacity," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 30(1), pages 111-125, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:30:y:2004:i:1:p:111-125
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    Cited by:

    1. Zeytinoglu, Isik U. & Denton, Margaret & Davies, Sharon & Plenderleith, Jennifer Millen, 2009. "Casualized employment and turnover intention: Home care workers in Ontario, Canada," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 91(3), pages 258-268, August.
    2. Isik U. Zeytinoglu & Margaret Denton & Sharon Davies & M. Bianca Seaton & Jennifer Millen, 2009. "Visiting and Office Home Care Workers’ Occupational Health: An Analysis of Workplace Flexibility and Worker Insecurity Measures Associated with Emotional and Physical Health," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 429, McMaster University.
    3. Alameddine, Mohamad & Laporte, Audrey & Baumann, Andrea & O'Brien-Pallas, Linda & Mildon, Barbara & Deber, Raisa, 2006. "'Stickiness' and 'inflow' as proxy measures of the relative attractiveness of various sub-sectors of nursing employment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(9), pages 2310-2319, November.
    4. Isik U. Zeytinoglu & Margaret Denton & Sharon Davies & M. Bianca Seaton & Jennifer Millen, 2008. "Visiting and Office Home Care Workers’ Occupational Health: An Analysis of Workplace Flexibility and Worker Insecurity Measures Associated with Emotional and Physical Health," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 234, McMaster University.
    5. Skinner, Mark W. & Rosenberg, Mark W., 2006. "Managing competition in the countryside: Non-profit and for-profit perceptions of long-term care in rural Ontario," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(11), pages 2864-2876, December.

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