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Trade, product cycles, and inequality within and between countries

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  • Susan Chun Zhu

Abstract

This paper incorporates Northern product innovation and product-cycle-driven technology transfer into the continuum-of-goods Heckscher-Ohlin model. The creation of very skill-intensive goods induces the North to transfer production of older, less skill-intensive goods to the South. These relocated goods are the most skill intensive by Southern standards. Hence, product cycles raise the relative demand for skilled workers and thus wage inequality within both regions. This runs contrary to the Stolper-Samuelson theorem, but accords well with the fact that wage inequality has risen in both Northern and Southern countries. Moreover, product cycles increase income inequality between countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Susan Chun Zhu, 2004. "Trade, product cycles, and inequality within and between countries," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1042-1060, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:37:y:2004:i:4:p:1042-1060
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sherif Khalifa & Evelina Mengova, 2010. "Offshoring And Wage Inequality In Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 35(3), pages 1-42, September.
    2. Ramezan Ali Marvi, 2014. "Technological Changes and Global Value Chains," AMSE Working Papers 1422, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France, revised 21 May 2014.
    3. David B. Audretsch & Mark Sanders, 2007. "Globalization and the Rise of the Entrepreneurial Economy," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-003, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    4. Roberto Álvarez & Ricardo A. López, 2009. "Skill Upgrading and the Real Exchange Rate," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(8), pages 1165-1179, August.
    5. Chen, Xiaoping & Lu, Yi & Zhu, Lianming, 2017. "Product cycle, contractibility, and global sourcing," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 283-296.
    6. Zhu, Susan Chun, 2005. "Can product cycles explain skill upgrading?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 131-155, May.
    7. Robert Feenstra & Gordon Hanson, 2001. "Global Production Sharing and Rising Inequality: A Survey of Trade and Wages," NBER Working Papers 8372, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Pham, Cong S., 2008. "Product specialization in international trade: A further investigation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 214-218, May.
    9. Joël Hellier & Nathalie Chusseau, 2010. "Globalization and the Inequality-Unemployment Tradeoff," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(5), pages 1028-1043, November.
    10. Fatima, Syeda Tamkeen, 2014. "Off-Shoring and Wage Inequality: where do we stand?," IEE Working Papers 207, Institut fuer Entwicklungsforschung und Entwicklungspolitik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum.
    11. Wang, Ming-cheng & Fang, Chen-ray & Huang, Li-hsuan, 2009. "International knowledge spillovers and wage inequality in developing countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1208-1214, November.
    12. Ramezan Ali Marvi, 2014. "Technological Changes and Global Value Chains," Working Papers halshs-00999232, HAL.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade

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