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China Standard Time: A Study in Strategic Industrial Policy


  • Linden Greg

    (University of California, Berkeley)


Chinas industrial policy for high-technology industries combines key features of the policies pursued elsewhere in East Asia such as opening to foreign investors and supporting domestic firms. Leveraging its large market size, China has gone further than other developing countries by promoting standards for products that compete in China with products controlled by major electronics companies. This paper analyzes the experience to date of this Chinese policy in the consumer optical storage industry in the context of Chinas evolving national innovation system. Chinas standard-setting policy is politicized but ultimately pragmatic, which avoids imposing excessive costs on the economy. It may also have dynamic learning benefits for Chinese firms who are starting to compete in global markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Linden Greg, 2004. "China Standard Time: A Study in Strategic Industrial Policy," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(3), pages 1-28, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:buspol:v:6:y:2004:i:3:n:4

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhu, Tianbiao, 2006. "Rethinking Import-substituting Industrialization: Development Strategies and Institutions in Taiwan and China," WIDER Working Paper Series 076, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Roman Stöllinger & Beate Muck, 2011. "Long Term Patterns of International Merchandise Trade," FIW Specials series 001, FIW.
    3. Gupta, Avnesh Kumar, 2014. "Industrial Policy for Inclusive Growth: An Analysis of Experiences of India and China," MPRA Paper 80035, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Mar 2014.
    4. Gao, Xudong, 2014. "A latecomer's strategy to promote a technology standard: The case of Datang and TD-SCDMA," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 597-607.
    5. Quirine van Voorst tot Voorst & Ruud Smits & John van den Elst, 2008. "Standardisation Processes in China and the European Union explained by Regional Innovation Systems," Innovation Studies Utrecht (ISU) working paper series 08-05, Utrecht University, Department of Innovation Studies, revised Feb 2008.
    6. Chen, Ling & Naughton, Barry, 2016. "An institutionalized policy-making mechanism: China’s return to techno-industrial policy," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(10), pages 2138-2152.
    7. Kim, Dong-hyu & Lee, Heejin & Kwak, Jooyoung & Seo, DongBack, 2014. "China׳s information security standardization: Analysis from the perspective of technical barriers to trade principles," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 592-600.

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