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Economic Growth: A Channel Decomposition Exercise

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  • Wong Wei-Kang

    () (National University of Singapore)

Abstract

This paper empirically decomposes the channels through which the determinants of growth operate. Methodologically, channel decomposition combines growth accounting with regression analysis. Under channel decomposition, the determinants could affect aggregate productivity growth through physical capital accumulation, through human capital acquisition, or through growth in total factor productivity (TFP). The results from channel decomposition show that TFP growth is the main channel of operation for most of the determinants. Specifically, TFP growth, not factor accumulation, is what accounts for conditional convergence. This finding is extremely robust. There is also no evidence that rich and poor countries converge through different channels.

Suggested Citation

  • Wong Wei-Kang, 2007. "Economic Growth: A Channel Decomposition Exercise," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-38, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:7:y:2007:i:1:n:4
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Shekhar Aiyar & Christian H Ebeke, 2016. "The Impact of Workforce Aging on European Productivity," IMF Working Papers 16/238, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Frensch, Richard & Gaucaite Wittich, Vitalija, 2009. "Product variety and technical change," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 242-257, March.
    3. Vollrath, Dietrich, 2008. "Wealth Distribution and the Provision of Public Goods: Evidence from the United States," MPRA Paper 11534, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. StevenN. Durlauf & Andros Kourtellos & ChihMing Tan, 2008. "Are Any Growth Theories Robust?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(527), pages 329-346, March.
    5. Vincenzo Scoppa, 2013. "Technological catch-up or neoclassical convergence? Identifying the channels of convergence for Italian regions," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 2(4), pages 169-181.
    6. Wong, Wei-Kang, 2004. "How good are trade and telephone call traffic in bridging income gaps and TFP gaps?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 441-463, December.
    7. Hartwig, Jochen, 2012. "Testing the growth effects of structural change," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 11-24.
    8. Silvia Dal Bianco, 2009. "A Reassessment of Italian Regional Convergence through a Non-Parametric Approach," Quaderni di Dipartimento 099, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    9. Esposti, Roberto, 2008. "Why Should Regional Agricultural Productivity Growth Converge? Evidence from Italian Regions," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 43955, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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