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Reforming the WTO to Defuse Potential Trade Conflicts in Genetically Modified Goods

Author

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  • Nicholas Perdikis
  • William A. Kerr Shelburne
  • Jill E. Hobbs

Abstract

Arguably genetic modification is one of the most important technological change seen to date. Its effects on both human health and the environment are both profound and controversial. In particular consumers, mainly in the EU, have concerns regarding the long term effects of consuming genetically modified foods on their health. They are also concerned regarding the effect that genetically modified organisms will have on bio-diversity and choice in the long run. Copyright Blackwell Publishers Ltd 2001.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas Perdikis & William A. Kerr Shelburne & Jill E. Hobbs, 2001. "Reforming the WTO to Defuse Potential Trade Conflicts in Genetically Modified Goods," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(3), pages 379-398, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:24:y:2001:i:3:p:379-398
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hobbs, A. L. & Hobbs, J. E. & Isaac, G. E. & Kerr, W. A., 2002. "Ethics, domestic food policy and trade law: assessing the EU animal welfare proposal to the WTO," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5-6), pages 437-454.
    2. House, Lisa & Lusk, Jayson L. & Jaeger, Sara & Traill, W. Bruce & Moore, Melissa & Valli, Carlotta & Morrow, Bert & Yee, Wallace M.S., 2004. "Objective And Subjective Knowledge: Impacts On Consumer Demand For Genetically Modified Foods In The United States And The European Union," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20125, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. Hobbs, Jill E. & Kerr, William A., 2006. "Consumer information, labelling and international trade in agri-food products," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 78-89, February.
    4. Matthias Gruber, 2004. "Inside or outside? The role of the WTO in the settlement of the transatlantic trade dispute on GMOs," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;German National Library of Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 39(1), pages 36-45, January.
    5. Chantal Pohl Nielsen & Kym Anderson, 2003. "Golden Rice and the Looming GMO Trade Debate: Implication for the Poor," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2003-22, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
    6. Nakuja, Tekuni & Kerr, William A., 2013. "Was Food Safety Declining?: Assessing the Justification for the US Food Safety Modernisation Act," Commissioned Papers 145969, Canadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network.
    7. Kerr, William A., 2003. "Science-based Rules of Trade: A Mantra for Some, An Anathema for Others," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 4(2).
    8. Martinez-Poveda, Africa & Molla-Bauza, Margarita Brugarolas & del Campo Gomis, Francisco Jose & Martinez, Laura Martinez-Carrasco, 2009. "Consumer-perceived risk model for the introduction of genetically modified food in Spain," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 519-528, December.
    9. Smyth, Stuart & Kerr, William A. & Phillips, Peter, 2010. "The Incompatibility of Science and Trade at the International Level," 14th ICABR Conference, June 16-18, 2010, Ravello, Italy 188113, International Consortium on Applied Bioeconomy Research (ICABR).

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