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A Tale of Two Fears: Exploring Media Depictions of Nuclear Power and Global Warming


  • Jon Palfreman


Advanced technologies like nuclear power and looming environmental threats such as global climate change present major policy challenge for modern cultures. Public policy about such crucial and complex issues depends on public attitudes, which, in turn, tend to be strongly affected by mass media coverage. How "well" has the mass media portrayed these two evolving risk stories? Employing perspectives from both journalism and social science, this article will first review the history of mass media coverage of each topic, then analyze their differences. Copyright 2006 by The Policy Studies Organization.

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  • Jon Palfreman, 2006. "A Tale of Two Fears: Exploring Media Depictions of Nuclear Power and Global Warming," Review of Policy Research, Policy Studies Organization, vol. 23(1), pages 23-43, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revpol:v:23:y:2006:i:1:p:23-43

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Liao, Shu-Yi & Tseng, Wei-Chun & Chen, Chi-Chung, 2010. "Eliciting public preference for nuclear energy against the backdrop of global warming," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 7054-7069, November.
    2. Heffron, Raphael J., 2013. "Nuclear energy policy in the United States 1990–2010: A federal or state responsibility?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 254-266.
    3. repec:eee:juipol:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:48-57 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Li, Hui & Jenkins-Smith, Hank C. & Silva, Carol L. & Berrens, Robert P. & Herron, Kerry G., 2009. "Public support for reducing US reliance on fossil fuels: Investigating household willingness-to-pay for energy research and development," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 731-742, January.

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