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Rank And Quantity Mobility In The Empirical Dynamics Of Inequality

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  • Michael Beenstock

Abstract

Horizontal and vertical measures of inequality are related through mobility. The paper draws attention to two types of mobility: quantity mobility, which refers to mobility in income itself, and rank mobility, which refers to mobility in the position in the distribution of income. Individually matched census data for earnings in Israel are used to illustrate these concepts empirically. Mobility is measured between 1983 and 1995. It is shown that earnings in Israel are highly mobile. The high degree of earnings mobility implies that horizontal measures of inequality considerably overstate the underlying level of inequality. The method of errors in variables is used to distinguish between current and permanent mobility and inequality. Permanent earnings are more equal than current earnings and less mobile. Finally, the methodology is applied to PSID. It is shown that earnings were more mobile in Israel than in the United States. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Michael Beenstock, 2004. "Rank And Quantity Mobility In The Empirical Dynamics Of Inequality," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 50(4), pages 519-541, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:50:y:2004:i:4:p:519-541
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    Cited by:

    1. Shi, Xuehua & Nuetah, J. Alexander & Xin, Xian, 2010. "Household income mobility in rural China: 1989-2006," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1090-1096, September.
    2. Michael Beenstock & Barry Chiswick & Ari Paltiel, 2010. "Testing the immigrant assimilation hypothesis with longitudinal data," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 7-27, March.
    3. Thomas Raferzeder & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2007. "Who is on the rise in Austria: Wage mobility and mobility risk," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 5(1), pages 39-51, April.
    4. Sami Bibi & Jean-Yves Duclos & Abdelkrim Araar, 2014. "Mobility, taxation and welfare," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 42(3), pages 503-527, March.
    5. Konstantin Gluschenko, 2010. "Price mobility of locations," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 99-103, January.
    6. Conniffe, Denis & O'Neill, Donal, 2009. "Efficient Probit Estimation with Partially Missing Covariates," IZA Discussion Papers 4081, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Michael Beenstock & Daniel Felsenstein, 2007. "Mobility and Mean Reversion in the Dynamics of Regional Inequality," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 30(4), pages 335-361, October.

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