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What Can Child Anthropometry Reveal about Living Standards and Public Policy? An Illustration from Central Asia

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  • Micklewright, John
  • Ismail, Suraiya

Abstract

The paper considers the case for the use of data on weight and height of children to assess living standards and public policy, contrasting them with monetized measures of welfare based on household incomes or expenditures. Data on child anthropometry are then used from Uzbekistan, the most populous of the Central Asian republics of the former Soviet Union, to investigate rural-urban differences in living standards, the impact of kindergartens on nutritional status, and the targeting of means-tested social assistance. Conclusions are drawn for the use of information on child anthropometry in the design of public policy. Copyright 2001 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

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  • Micklewright, John & Ismail, Suraiya, 2001. "What Can Child Anthropometry Reveal about Living Standards and Public Policy? An Illustration from Central Asia," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 47(1), pages 65-80, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:47:y:2001:i:1:p:65-80
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    Cited by:

    1. Brück, Tilman & Esenaliev, Damir & Kroeger, Antje & Kudebayeva, Alma & Mirkasimov, Bakhrom & Steiner, Susan, 2014. "Household survey data for research on well-being and behavior in Central Asia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, pages 819-835.
    2. Bhalotra, Sonia & Valente, Christine & van Soest, Arthur, 2010. "The puzzle of Muslim advantage in child survival in India," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 191-204, March.
    3. Gørgens, Tue & Meng, Xin & Vaithianathan, Rhema, 2012. "Stunting and selection effects of famine: A case study of the Great Chinese Famine," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 99-111.
    4. Harkness, Susan, 2004. "Social and Political Indicators of Human Well-being," WIDER Working Paper Series 033, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Rasmus Heltberg, 2009. "Malnutrition, poverty, and economic growth," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(S1), pages 77-88, April.
    6. Meng, Xin & Qian, Nancy, 2006. "The Long Run Health and Economic Consequences of Famine on Survivors: Evidence from China's Great Famine," CEPR Discussion Papers 5989, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Sonia Bhalotra, 2001. "Growth and welfare provisioning: lessons from the English Poor Laws?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pages 1083-1096.
    8. Molini, Vasco & Nubé, Maarten & van den Boom, Bart, 2010. "Adult BMI as a Health and Nutritional Inequality Measure: Applications at Macro and Micro Levels," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 1012-1023, July.
    9. Xin Meng & Nancy Qian, 2009. "The Long Term Consequences of Famine on Survivors: Evidence from a Unique Natural Experiment using China's Great Famine," NBER Working Papers 14917, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Stillman, Steven, 2006. "Health and nutrition in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union during the decade of transition: A review of the literature," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, pages 104-146.
    11. Bhalotra, Sonia, 2002. "Welfare Implications of Fiscal Reform: The Case of Food Subsidies in India," WIDER Working Paper Series 032, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Micklewright, John & Coudouel, Aline & Marnie, Sheila, 2004. "Targeting and Self-Targeting in a New Social Assistance Scheme," IZA Discussion Papers 1112, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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