IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/revinw/v44y1998i1p81-98.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Estimation of Poverty Dynamics Using Different Measurements of Household Income

Author

Listed:
  • Rendtel, Ulrich
  • Langeheine, Rolf
  • Berntsen, Roland

Abstract

If surveys offer two different measurements of household income, one can use them simultaneously to identify the potential effects of measurement error on the observed-income mobility of the poor. In this paper, the authors investigate transition tables between subsequent income states. Latent Markov models are used to model incorrect classifications of income states. Misclassifications are interpreted as measurement error or spurious changes that are not consistent with a simple transition table model. The empirical results for the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) show that the observed transition tables overestimate the mobility between poverty states. Copyright 1998 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Rendtel, Ulrich & Langeheine, Rolf & Berntsen, Roland, 1998. "The Estimation of Poverty Dynamics Using Different Measurements of Household Income," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 44(1), pages 81-98, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:44:y:1998:i:1:p:81-98
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Dimitris Pavlopoulos & Ruud Muffels & Jeroen K. Vermunt, 2009. "Training and Low-pay Mobility: The Case of the UK and the Netherlands," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(s1), pages 37-59, March.
    2. Martin Ravallion, 2003. "Measuring Aggregate Welfare in Developing Countries: How Well Do National Accounts and Surveys Agree?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(3), pages 645-652, August.
    3. Duclos, Jean-Yves & Araar, Abdelkrim & Giles, John, 2010. "Chronic and transient poverty: Measurement and estimation, with evidence from China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 266-277, March.
    4. Arne Bigsten & Abebe Shimeles, 2011. "The persistence of urban poverty in Ethiopia: a tale of two measurements," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(9), pages 835-839.
    5. Larrimore, Jeff & Mortenson, Jacob & Splinter, David, 2015. "Income and Earnings Mobility in U.S. Tax Data," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-61, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    6. François Langot & Shaimaa Yassin, 2015. "Reforming Employment Protection in Egypt: An Evaluation Based on Transition Models with Measurement Errors," Working Papers 918, Economic Research Forum, revised Jun 2015.
    7. Espen Villanger, 2003. "The effects of disasters on income mobility: Bootstrap inference and measurement error simulations," CMI Working Papers WP 2003:6, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    8. Ulrich Rendtel, 2006. "The 2005 Plenary Meeting on ‘‘Missing Data and Measurement Error’’," AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis, Springer;German Statistical Society, vol. 90(4), pages 493-499, December.
    9. Diana Worts & Amanda Sacker & Peggy McDonough, 2010. "Re-Assessing Poverty Dynamics and State Protections in Britain and the US: The Role of Measurement Error," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 97(3), pages 419-438, July.
    10. Perez, Victor, 2015. "Moving in and out of poverty in Mexico: What can we learn from pseudo-panel methods?," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:44:y:1998:i:1:p:81-98. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iariwea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.