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The geographical and institutional proximity of research collaboration

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  • Roderik Ponds
  • Frank van Oort
  • Koen Frenken

Abstract

Collaboration and the exchange of knowledge are supposedly made easier by geographical proximity because of the tacit character of knowledge. Recently a number of scholars' criticised this view on geographical proximity as being oversimplified and argued that the precise role of geographical proximity for knowledge exchange and collaboration still remains unclear. This paper analyses the role of geographical proximity for collaborative scientific research in science-based technologies between universities, companies and governmental research institutes. We test the hypothesis that the collaboration between different kinds of organisations is more geographically localised than collaboration between organisations that are similar due to institutional proximity. Using data on co-publications, collaborations patterns are analysed and the hypothesis is confirmed. Copyright (c) 2007 the author(s). Journal compilation (c) 2007 RSAI.

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  • Roderik Ponds & Frank van Oort & Koen Frenken, 2007. "The geographical and institutional proximity of research collaboration," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 86(3), pages 423-443, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:presci:v:86:y:2007:i:3:p:423-443
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    1. Muhammed Dalgin & Vitor Trindade & Devashish Mitra, 2008. "Inequality, Nonhomothetic Preferences, and Trade: A Gravity Approach," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(3), pages 747-774, January.
    2. Zoltán J. Ács, 2002. "Innovation and the Growth of Cities," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2656, April.
    3. Erik Canton & Debby Lanser & Joëlle Noailly & Marieke Rensman & Martijn van de Ven, 2005. "Crossing borders; when science meets industry," CPB Document 98, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
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