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Choice of Treatment Intensities by a Nonprofit Hospital under Prospective Pricing


  • Rogerson, William P


Under prospective pricing, payers for health care essentially use price regulation of hospitals as a way of indirectly regulating the provision of treatment intensity. This paper presents a theory of how a nonprofit hospital selects treatment intensities for its products given the payer's choice of prices and then determines how the payer should select prices in light of this theory. The main result is that, in equilibrium, the ratio of price to marginal cost will vary across products inversely with the elasticity of demand with respect to treatment intensity. This means that, generally, the hospital will earn positive (negative) accounting profit on products with low-(high-) intensity elasticities of demand. Copyright 1994 by MIT Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Rogerson, William P, 1994. "Choice of Treatment Intensities by a Nonprofit Hospital under Prospective Pricing," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(1), pages 7-51, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jemstr:v:3:y:1994:i:1:p:7-51

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Jaskold Gabszewicz, J. & Thisse, J. -F., 1979. "Price competition, quality and income disparities," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 340-359, June.
    5. Milgrom, Paul & Roberts, John, 1986. "Price and Advertising Signals of Product Quality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(4), pages 796-821, August.
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    7. Avner Shaked & John Sutton, 1982. "Relaxing Price Competition Through Product Differentiation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(1), pages 3-13.
    8. Archibald, Robert B & Haulman, Clyde A & Moody, Carlisle E, Jr, 1983. " Quality, Price, Advertising, and Published Quality Ratings," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(4), pages 347-356, March.
    9. Nelson, Phillip, 1970. "Information and Consumer Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 78(2), pages 311-329, March-Apr.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chalkley, Martin & Malcomson, James M., 1998. "Contracting for health services when patient demand does not reflect quality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 1-19, January.
    2. repec:rdg:wpaper:em-dp2004-25 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Chalkley, Martin & McVicar, Duncan, 2008. "Choice of contracts in the British National Health Service: An empirical study," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1155-1167, September.
    4. Yoshida, Atsushi & Kawamura, Akira, 2009. "Who has benefited from the health services system for the elderly in Japan?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 256-269, August.
    5. Prashant C. Fuloria & Stefanos A. Zenios, 2001. "Outcomes-Adjusted Reimbursement in a Health-Care Delivery System," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 47(6), pages 735-751, June.
    6. Calem, Paul S. & Dor, Avi & Rizzo, John A., 1999. "The welfare effects of mergers in the hospital industry," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 197-213, May.
    7. Ma, Ching-to Albert & Mak, Henry Y., 2015. "Information disclosure and the equivalence of prospective payment and cost reimbursement," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 439-452.
    8. Kesteloot, K. & Voet, N., 1998. "Incentives for cooperation in quality improvement among hospitals--the impact of the reimbursement system," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 701-728, December.
    9. Alexandre Marinho, 2015. "The Process of Public Resources Allocation for Investment in Hospital Capacities," Discussion Papers 0121, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
    10. Frank, Richard G. & Glazer, Jacob & McGuire, Thomas G., 2000. "Measuring adverse selection in managed health care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 829-854, November.
    11. Ellis, Randall P., 1998. "Creaming, skimping and dumping: provider competition on the intensive and extensive margins1," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 537-555, October.
    12. Gravelle, Hugh, 1999. "Capitation contracts: access and quality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 315-340, June.
    13. Feess, Eberhard & Ossig, Sonja, 2007. "Reimbursement schemes for hospitals, malpractice liability, and intrinsic motivation," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 423-441, December.
    14. Thomas G. McGuire & Jacob Glazer, 2000. "Optimal Risk Adjustment in Markets with Adverse Selection: An Application to Managed Care," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 1055-1071, September.
    15. Edward C. Norton & Courtney Harold Van Houtven & Richard C. Lindrooth & Sharon-Lise T. Normand & Barbara Dickey, 2002. "Does prospective payment reduce inpatient length of stay?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(5), pages 377-387.
    16. Olivella, Pau, 2003. "Shifting public-health-sector waiting lists to the private sector," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 103-132, March.
    17. Ellis, Randall P. & McGuire, Thomas G., 1996. "Hospital response to prospective payment: Moral hazard, selection, and practice-style effects," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 257-277, June.
    18. Liu, Ting & Ma, Ching-to Albert, 2013. "Health insurance, treatment plan, and delegation to altruistic physician," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 79-96.
    19. Joy Grossman & Dwayne Banks, 1998. "Unrestricted Entry and Nonprice Competition: The Case of Technological Adoption in Hospitals," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 223-245.
    20. Vislie, Jon, 2009. "Incentive Contracts for Public Health Care Provision under Adverse Selection and Moral Hazard," HERO On line Working Paper Series 2001:6, Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme.
    21. Siciliani, Luigi, 2006. "Selection of treatment under prospective payment systems in the hospital sector," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 479-499, May.
    22. Alessandra Ferrari, 2004. "The payment of hospital services: a waiting lists model," Economic Analysis Research Group Working Papers earg-wp2004-05, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    23. Makoto Kakinaka & Ryuta Kato, 2013. "Regulated medical fee schedule of the Japanese health care system," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 301-317, December.

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