IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/ijurrs/v30y2006i4p776-797.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Respectability, Roughness and ‘Race’: Neighbourhood Place Images and the Making of Working‐Class Social Distinctions in London

Author

Listed:
  • PAUL WATT

Abstract

Housing has come to play an important role in demarcating the contours of social polarization in inner London, notably via the widening socio‐spatial divide between an impoverished working class located in council housing estates and affluent home‐owning gentrifiers. In mass media and policy discourses, the former are routinely represented as an unruly urban ‘underclass’, a representation that homogenizes council tenants and marginalizes their voices. This article aims to move beyond a narrow underclass perspective by providing an in‐depth analysis of neighbourhood place images and social identity based on interviews with white working‐class council tenants in the inner London Borough of Camden. Drawing on debates around social distinction and place, the article illustrates a complex set of neighbourhood images rooted in narratives of urban decline as well as notions of belonging and knowing people. The article examines these place images in relation to the longstanding status distinction between respectability and roughness, as well as ‘race’. In conclusion, the defensive and exclusionary elements of neighbourhood images are related to processes of social deprivation and insecurity that have affected working‐class council tenants in Camden.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Watt, 2006. "Respectability, Roughness and ‘Race’: Neighbourhood Place Images and the Making of Working‐Class Social Distinctions in London," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(4), pages 776-797, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ijurrs:v:30:y:2006:i:4:p:776-797
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-2427.2006.00688.x
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2427.2006.00688.x
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Olechnowicz, Andrzej, 1997. "Working-Class Housing in England between the Wars: The Becontree Estate," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198206507.
    2. Max Travers, 1999. "Qualitative Sociology and Social Class," Sociological Research Online, Sociological Research Online, vol. 4(1).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Elias le Grand, 2015. "Linking Moralisation and Class Identity: The Role of Ressentiment and Respectability in the Social Reaction to ‘Chavs’," Sociological Research Online, Sociological Research Online, vol. 20(4), pages 1-15.
    2. Andrew Wallace, 2010. "New Neighbourhoods, New Citizens? Challenging ‘Community’ as a Framework for Social and Moral Regeneration under New Labour in the UK," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(4), pages 805-819, December.
    3. Paul Watt, 2008. "The Only Class in Town? Gentrification and the Middle‐Class Colonization of the City and the Urban Imagination," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(1), pages 206-211, March.
    4. Nathan Marom, 2014. "Relating a City's History and Geography with Bourdieu: One Hundred Years of Spatial Distinction in Tel Aviv," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(4), pages 1344-1362, July.
    5. Loïc Wacquant, 2008. "Relocating Gentrification: The Working Class, Science and the State in Recent Urban Research," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(1), pages 198-205, March.
    6. Martina Byrne & Brid Ni Chonaill, 2014. "‘Ghettos of the Mind’: Realities and Myths in the Construction of the Social Identity of a Dublin Suburb," Sociological Research Online, Sociological Research Online, vol. 19(3), pages 1-17.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ijurrs:v:30:y:2006:i:4:p:776-797. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0309-1317 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.