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Migration and remittances in island microstates: a comparative perspective on the South Pacific and the Caribbean

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  • John Connell

Abstract

For several decades there has been extensive migration from the small island states of the South Pacific and the eastern Caribbean to metropolitan countries, resulting in absolute population decline in some states and new social, economic and political relationships between these island regions and distant worlds. Early research on the consequences for island development of return migration and remittances dwelt upon the unproductive nature of expenditures and the various problems return migration and remittances cause. Questioning this view, a new conceptualization of the influences of migration, circulation and remittances on recipient families, communities and societies in the island states of the South Pacific and the Caribbean is presented. Regional similarities and differences are recognized, yet commonalities of island microstates' experiences emerge. Remittances are a very significant private transfer of capital and return migrants represent people endowed with human capital, capable of enriching the social and cultural capital stocks of their island communities. In both insular regions, the consolidation of transnational linkages emphasizes the significance of diaspora relations for migrant households at home and abroad and offers some prospects for sustainable development, beyond those offered solely by domestic economic opportunities. Copyright Joint Editors and Blackwell Publishers Ltd 2000.

Suggested Citation

  • John Connell, 2000. "Migration and remittances in island microstates: a comparative perspective on the South Pacific and the Caribbean," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(1), pages 52-78, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ijurrs:v:24:y:2000:i:1:p:52-78
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    Cited by:

    1. Hrushikesh Mallick, 2008. "Do remittances impact the economy? Some empirical evidences from a developing economy," Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum Working Papers 407, Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum, India.
    2. Connell, John, 2014. "The two cultures of health worker migration: A Pacific perspective," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 73-81.
    3. Prachi Mishra, 2006. "Emigration and Brain Drain; Evidence From the Caribbean," IMF Working Papers 06/25, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Buch, Claudia M. & Kuckulenz, Anja & Le Manchec, Marie-Helene, 2002. "Worker Remittances and Capital Flows," Kiel Working Papers 1130, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Mamgain, Rajendra P., 2004. "Employment, migration and livelihoods in the Hill Economy of Uttaranchal," MPRA Paper 32303, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Kuckulenz, Anja & Buch, Claudia M., 2004. "Worker Remittances and Capital Flows to Developing Countries," ZEW Discussion Papers 04-31, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    7. Hrushikesh Mallick, 2009. "Do Remittances Impact the Economy? Some Empirical Evidences from A Developing Economy," Working Papers id:2199, eSocialSciences.
    8. Delwar Hossain, 2014. "Differential Impacts of Foreign Capital and Remittance Inflows on Domestic Savings in the Developing Countries: A Dynamic Heterogeneous Panel Analysis," Departmental Working Papers 2014-07, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    9. Cynthia Werner & Holly R. Barcus, 2009. "Mobility and Immobility in a Transnational Context: Changing Views of Migration among the Kazakh Diaspora in Mongolia," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 6(1), pages 49-62, April.
    10. L. De & J. Gaillard & W. Friesen & F. Smith, 2015. "Remittances in the face of disasters: a case study of rural Samoa," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 653-672, June.
    11. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00367704 is not listed on IDEAS

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