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Symposium on Market development and inequality in China1

Author

Listed:
  • Ravi Kanbur
  • Yingyi Qian
  • Xiaobo Zhang

Abstract

After three decades of market development, the problem in China is no longer how to achieve growth but how to manage its consequences and how to sustain it. One of the most important consequences is the growing inequality – between skilled and unskilled workers, between the genders, between rural and urban areas, and between inland and coastal regions. The papers in this symposium shed light on the important issue of inequality during rapid market development in China. Analysis based on ground level empirical studies can help us to understand better the sources of the rising inequality and to illuminate the nature of the future challenges.

Suggested Citation

  • Ravi Kanbur & Yingyi Qian & Xiaobo Zhang, 2008. "Symposium on Market development and inequality in China1," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 16(1), pages 1-5, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:16:y:2008:i:1:p:1-5
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0351.2007.00319.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kong-Yam Tan, 2007. "Incremental Reform and Distortions in China's Product and Factor Markets," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 279-299, March.
    2. Bai, Chong-En & Du, Yingjuan & Tao, Zhigang & Tong, Sarah Y., 2004. "Local protectionism and regional specialization: evidence from China's industries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 397-417, July.
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