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Analyzing Income Distribution in Australia

Author

Listed:
  • Meagher, G A
  • Dixon, Peter B

Abstract

This paper contains an analysis of the sources of income inequality in Australia, based on data from the ABS income survey for 1978-79. The analysis pr oceeds by progressive decomposition of the population into component groups differentiated by characteristics such as sex, age, employment status, and occupation. Total inequality is partitioned into contrib utions from within and between the component groups, as measured by t he Shorrocks Io index. Copyright 1986 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Meagher, G A & Dixon, Peter B, 1986. "Analyzing Income Distribution in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 62(179), pages 427-441, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:62:y:1986:i:179:p:427-41
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Borland, Jeff, 1999. "Earnings Inequality in Australia: Changes, Causes and Consequences," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 75(229), pages 177-202, June.
    2. Peter Gottschalk, 1997. "Inequality, Income Growth, and Mobility: The Basic Facts," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 21-40, Spring.
    3. Mills, Jeffrey A & Zandvakili, Sourushe, 1997. "Statistical Inference via Bootstrapping for Measures of Inequality," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(2), pages 133-150, March-Apr.
    4. Biewen, Martin, 2002. "Bootstrap inference for inequality, mobility and poverty measurement," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(2), pages 317-342, June.
    5. Coulter, Fiona A E & Cowell, Frank A & Jenkins, Stephen P, 1992. "Equivalence Scale Relativities and the Extent of Inequality and Poverty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(414), pages 1067-1082, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Saunders, 1994. "Immigrants and the Distribution of Income: National and International Comparisons," LIS Working papers 123, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    2. Maheshwar Rao & Robert Tanton & Yogi Vidyattama, 2013. "‘A Systems Approach to Analyse the Impacts of Water Policy Reform in the Murray-Darling Basin: a conceptual and an analytical framework’," NATSEM Working Paper Series 13/22, University of Canberra, National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling.
    3. Anthony Shorrocks & Guanghua Wan, 2005. "Spatial decomposition of inequality," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 59-81, January.
    4. Anthony B. Atkinson & Andrew Leigh, 2007. "The Distribution of Top Incomes in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 83(262), pages 247-261, September.
    5. Paul Blacklow & Ranjan Ray, 2000. "A Comparison of Income and Expenditure Inequality Estimates: The Australian Evidence, 1975-76 to 1993-94," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 33(4), pages 317-329.
    6. Stefan Boeters & Michael Feil & Nicole Gürtzgen, 2007. "Discrete Working Time Choice in an Applied General Equilibrium Model," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 29(3), pages 427-427, May.
    7. George Verikios & Xiao-guang Zhang, 2012. "Microeconomic Reform and Income Distribution: The case of Australian Ports and Rail Freight Industries," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-230, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    8. George Verikios & Xiao-guang Zhang, 2010. "Structural Change in the Australian Electricity Industry During the 1990s and the Effect on Household Income Distribution," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-207, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.

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