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How Much Are We Willing To Contribute For Better Educational Outcomes? Evidence From A Survey Experiment

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Listed:
  • Samuel Berlinski
  • Matias Busso

Abstract

type="main" xml:id="ecin12247-abs-0001"> We use a survey experiment on a sample of Argentine households to elicit willingness to contribute toward improving the performance of public school students in international educational assessments. Households are presented with a sequence of bids that they can accept or reject. Information is presented in vignettes that vary in the proportion of children who benefited from the gains in educational attainment. We find a higher willingness to contribute for larger gains. In total, households would be willing to contribute an additional 12.8% of current educational expenditure to guarantee improved education quality. (JEL I22, I25, C83, H52)

Suggested Citation

  • Samuel Berlinski & Matias Busso, 2016. "How Much Are We Willing To Contribute For Better Educational Outcomes? Evidence From A Survey Experiment," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(1), pages 63-75, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:54:y:2016:i:1:p:63-75
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/ecin.2016.54.issue-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education

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