IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/ajarec/v51y2007i2p195-211.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The economics of land fragmentation in the north of Vietnam

Author

Listed:
  • Pham Van Hung
  • T. Gordon MacAulay
  • Sally P. Marsh

Abstract

Land fragmentation, where a single farm has a number of parcels of land, is a common feature of agriculture in many countries, especially in developing countries. In Vietnam, land fragmentation is common, especially in the north. For the whole country, there are about 75 million parcels of land, an average of seven to eight plots per farm household. Such fragmentation can be seen to have negative and positive benefits for farm households and the community generally. Comparative statics analysis and analysis of survey data have led to the conclusion that small-sized farms are likely to be more fragmented, and that fragmentation had a negative impact on crop productivity and increased family labour use and other money expenses. Policies which allow the appropriate opportunity cost of labour to be reflected at the farm level may provide appropriate incentives to trigger farm size change and land consolidation. Policies which tip the benefits in favour of fewer and larger plots, such as strong and effective research and development, an active extension system and strong administrative management, may also lead to land consolidation. Copyright 2007 The Authors Journal Compilation 2007 Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society Inc. and Blackwell Publishers Ltd .

Suggested Citation

  • Pham Van Hung & T. Gordon MacAulay & Sally P. Marsh, 2007. "The economics of land fragmentation in the north of Vietnam ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(2), pages 195-211, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ajarec:v:51:y:2007:i:2:p:195-211
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8489.2007.00378.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Yating, Zeng & Yanhong, Jin & Zhong, Tang, 2016. "Investigating the Relationship between Land and Labor Endowments and Agricultural Mechanization among Chinese Farmers," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236367, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Nguyen, Huy, 2014. "Crop diversification, economic performance and household’s behaviours Evidence from Vietnam," MPRA Paper 59090, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Arimoto, Yutaka, 2011. "The impact of farmland readjustment and consolidation on structural adjustment: The case of Niigata, Japan," CEI Working Paper Series 2011-3, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    4. Ali,Daniel Ayalew & Deininger,Klaus W. & Ronchi,Loraine, 2015. "Costs and benefits of land fragmentation : evidence from Rwanda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7290, The World Bank.
    5. Klaus Deininger & Daniel Monchuk & Hari K Nagarajan & Sudhir K Singh, 2017. "Does Land Fragmentation Increase the Cost of Cultivation? Evidence from India," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(1), pages 82-98, January.
    6. Stefanija Veljanoska, 2017. "Can Land Fragmentation Reduce the Exposure of Rural Households to Weather Variability?," Working Papers 2017.08, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    7. Coxhead, Ian & Vu, Linh & Nguyen, Cuong, 2016. "Migration in Vietnam: New Evidence from Recent Surveys," MPRA Paper 70217, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Latruffe, Laure & Piet, Laurent, 2013. "Does land fragmentation affect farm performance? A case study from Brittany," Factor Markets Working Papers 151, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    9. Latruffe, Laure & Piet, Laurent, 2013. "Does land fragmentation affect farm performance? A case study from Brittany," Factor Markets Working Papers 151, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    10. Nguyen, Huy, 2014. "The effect of land fragmentation on labor allocation and the economic diversity of farm households: The case of Vietnam," MPRA Paper 57521, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Kawasaki, Kentaro, 2011. "The Impact of Land Fragmentation on Rice Production Cost and Input Use," Japanese Journal of Rural Economics, Agricultural Economics Society of Japan (AESJ), vol. 13.
    12. repec:gam:jlands:v:5:y:2016:i:2:p:8:d:66698 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Sauer, Johannes & Gorton, Matthew & Davidova, Sophia, 2014. "Migration and Agricultural Efficiency," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 172684, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    14. repec:eee:agisys:v:153:y:2017:i:c:p:148-156 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Thomas Markussen & Finn Tarp & Do Huy Thiep & Nguyen Do Anh Tuan, 2016. "Inter- and intra-farm land fragmentation in Viet Nam," WIDER Working Paper Series 011, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    16. Peter Narh & Cosmas Kombat Lambini & Matthew Sabbi & Van Dien Pham & Trung Thanh Nguyen, 2016. "Land Sector Reforms in Ghana, Kenya and Vietnam: A Comparative Analysis of Their Effectiveness," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(2), pages 1-17, March.
    17. Stefanija Veljanoska, 2017. "Can Land Fragmentation Reduce the Exposure of Rural Households to Weather Variability?," Policy Papers 2017.02, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    18. Ha, Tuan M. & Bosch, Ockie J.H. & Nguyen, Nam C. & Trinh, Chung T., 2017. "System dynamics modelling for defining livelihood strategies for women smallholder farmers in lowland and upland regions of northern Vietnam: A comparative analysis," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 12-20.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ajarec:v:51:y:2007:i:2:p:195-211. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aaresea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.