IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bdr/ensayo/v24y2006i51p208-261.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Movilidad intergeneracional en Colombia

Author

Listed:
  • Katherine Cartagena

    ()

Abstract

En este trabajo se analiza la movilidad educativa entre generaciones en Colombia desde 1915 hasta 2003. A través de un nuevo índice se mide la movilidad intergeneracional ascendente, entendida como la probabilidad neta de que los hijos superen la educación de sus padres. Para examinar la incidencia de los retornos de la educación sobre las decisiones educativas y, particularmente, sobre la movilidad intergeneracional, fue necesario construir una serie de rentabilidad de la educación que cubriera el mismo período que el indicador de movilidad. El análisis muestra un considerable aumento de la educación entre generaciones y señala una disminución en el ritmo de crecimiento de la movilidad intergeneracional desde mediados de la década de los setenta; esto podría explicarse, entre otros factores, por el descenso en los retornos de la educación. Finalmente, en el documento se sugiere la existencia de imperfecciones en el mercado para el financiamiento de la educación superior.

Suggested Citation

  • Katherine Cartagena, 2006. "Movilidad intergeneracional en Colombia," Revista ESPE - Ensayos sobre Política Económica, Banco de la Republica de Colombia, vol. 24(51), pages 208-261, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdr:ensayo:v:24:y:2006:i:51:p:208-261
    DOI: 10.32468/Espe.5104
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.32468/Espe.5104
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    2. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, J. -S., 2001. "Changes in the wage structure, family income, and children's education," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 890-904, May.
    3. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, "undated". "The Productivity of Nations," Working Papers 96012, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    4. Fields, Gary S. & Ok, Efe A., 1996. "The Meaning and Measurement of Income Mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 349-377, November.
    5. Dardanoni Valentino, 1993. "Measuring Social Mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 372-394, December.
    6. Alejandro Gaviria & Momi Dahan, 1999. "Sibling Correlations and Social Mobility in Latin America," Research Department Publications 4162, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David Orlando Ruiz Castro, 2011. "Desigualdad de Oportunidades en Colombia," Documentos de Trabajo - CIDSE 011061, Universidad del Valle - CIDSE.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. repec:dau:papers:123456789/4994 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Tom Krebs & Pravin Krishna & William Maloney, 2013. "Income Mobility and Welfare," IMF Working Papers 2013/024, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Mario Amendola & Francesco Vona, 2012. "Coordinating the accumulation of physical and human capital in different institutional settings," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(7), pages 631-653, October.
    4. Rolf Aaberge & Magne Mogstad, 2009. "On the Measurement of Long-Term Income Inequality and Income Mobility," ICER Working Papers 09-2009, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
    5. Satya R. Chakravarty & Nachiketa Chattopadhyay & Nora Lustig & Rodrigo Aranda, 2020. "Measuring Directional Mobility: The Bartholomew and Prais-Bibby Indices Reconsidered," Research on Economic Inequality, in: Juan Gabriel Rodríguez & John A. Bishop (ed.), Inequality, Redistribution and Mobility, volume 28, pages 75-96, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    6. Daniele Checchi & Luca Flabbi, 2013. "Intergenerational Mobility and Schooling Decisions in Germany and Italy: The Impact of Secondary School Tracks," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, issue 3, pages 7-57, July-Sept.
    7. Ferreira , Francisco H. G., 2010. "Distributions in motion: economic growth, inequality, and poverty dynamics," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5424, The World Bank.
    8. Chiara Gigliarano & Francesco Chelli, 2016. "Measuring inter-temporal intragenerational mobility: an application to the Italian labour market," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 89-102, January.
    9. John Hassler & José Rodríguez Mora & Joseph Zeira, 2007. "Inequality and mobility," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 235-259, September.
    10. Debasis Bandyopadhyay & Xueli Tang, 2011. "Parental nurturing and adverse effects of redistribution," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 71-98, March.
    11. Peter Gottschalk & Enrico Spolaore, 2002. "On the Evaluation of Economic Mobility," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(1), pages 191-208.
    12. Gerhard Riener, 2012. "Inequality and mobility of household incomes in Europe: evidence from the ECHP," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(3), pages 279-288, January.
    13. Ben-Halima, B. & Chusseau, N. & Hellier, J., 2014. "Skill premia and intergenerational education mobility: The French case," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 50-64.
    14. Yoram Amiel & Michele Bernasconi & Frank Cowell & Valentino Dardanoni, 2015. "Do we value mobility?," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 44(2), pages 231-255, February.
    15. Joachim Jarreau, 2015. "The Impact of Naturalizations on Job Mobility and Wages: Evidence from France," Working Papers halshs-01117449, HAL.
    16. Kailash Chandra Pradhan & Shrabani Mukherjee & Shrabani Mukherjee, 2015. "The Income Mobility in Rural India: Evidence From ARIS/ REDS Surveys," Working Papers 2015-109, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.
    17. Daniele Checchi, 1997. "Education and Intergenerational Mobility in Occupations," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 66(1), pages 136-144.
    18. Kailash Chandra Pradhan and Shrabani Mukherjee, 2018. "The Income Transition in Rural India: Evidence from Aris/Reds Surveys," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 43(2), pages 45-66, June.
    19. Sami Bibi & Jean-Yves Duclos & Abdelkrim Araar, 2014. "Mobility, taxation and welfare," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 42(3), pages 503-527, March.
    20. Robert Aebi & Klaus Neusser & Peter Steiner, 2006. "A Large Deviation Approach to the Measurement of Mobility," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 142(II), pages 195-222, June.
    21. Bas Jacobs & Hongyan Yang, 2013. "Second-Best Income Taxation with Endogenous Human Capital and Borrowing Constraints," CESifo Working Paper Series 4155, CESifo.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    educación; capital humano; movilidad educativa intergeneracional; retornos de la educación; imperfecciones del mercado de crédito; desempleo.Note:;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • O49 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Other

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bdr:ensayo:v:24:y:2006:i:51:p:208-261. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Clorith Angélica Bahos Olivera). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/brcgvco.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.