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Passive Money, Active Money, and Monetary Policy




This article by the Bank's visiting economist examines the role of money in the transmission of monetary policy. Professor Laidler argues against the view of money as a passive variable that reacts to changes in prices, output, and interest rates but has no direct causative effecton them. He maintains that the empirical evidence supports the view of money playing an active role in the transmission mechanism. While he agrees that individual monetary aggregates can be difficult to read because of instabilities in the demand-for-money function, he argues that monetary aggregates, particularly those relating to transactions money, should have a more significant place in the hierarchy of policy variables that the Bank considers when formulating monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • David Laidler, 1999. "Passive Money, Active Money, and Monetary Policy," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 1999(Summer), pages 15-25.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bcarev:v:1999:y:1999:i:summer99:p:15-25

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. George J. Benston & George G. Kaufman, 1998. "Deposit insurance reform in the FDIC Improvement Act: the experience to date," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q II, pages 2-20.
    2. Miller, Marcus & Zhang, Lei, 2000. "Sovereign Liquidity Crises: The Strategic Case for a Payments Standstill," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(460), pages 335-362, January.
    3. Cohen, Daniel, 2001. "The HIPC Initiative: True and False Promises," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 363-380, Winter.
    4. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    5. Kenneth Rogoff, 1999. "International Institutions for Reducing Global Financial Instability," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 21-42, Fall.
    6. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1977. "Rules Rather Than Discretion: The Inconsistency of Optimal Plans," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 473-491, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stracca, Livio, 2007. "Should we take inside money seriously?," Working Paper Series 841, European Central Bank.
    2. Piti Disyatat, 2008. "Monetary policy implementation: Misconceptions and their consequences," BIS Working Papers 269, Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Borio, Claudio & Zhu, Haibin, 2012. "Capital regulation, risk-taking and monetary policy: A missing link in the transmission mechanism?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 236-251.
    4. Marc Lavoie & Mario Seccareccia, 2012. "Monetary Policy in a Period of Financial Chaos: The Political Economy of the Bank of Canada in Extraordinary Times," Chapters,in: Monetary Policy and Central Banking, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Stracca, Livio, 2013. "Inside Money In General Equilibrium: Does It Matter For Monetary Policy?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(03), pages 563-590, April.
    6. Ramdane Djoudad & Jack Selody & Carolyn Wilkins, 2005. "Does Financial Structure Matter for the Information Content of Financial Indicators?," Staff Working Papers 05-33, Bank of Canada.
    7. Takeshi Kimura & Hiroshi Kobayashi & Jun Muranaga & Hiroshi Ugai, 2003. "The effect of the increase in the monetary base of Japan's economy at zero interest rates: an empirical analysis," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Monetary policy in a changing environment, volume 19, pages 276-312 Bank for International Settlements.
    8. W A Razzak, 2001. "Money in the era of inflation targeting," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2001/02, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    9. Jan Korda, 2011. "Monetární nerovnováha v teorii endogenních peněz
      [Monetary Disequilibrium in the Theory of Endogenous Money]
      ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2011(5), pages 680-705.
    10. Pierre L. Siklos & Andrew G. Barton, 2001. "Monetary aggregates as indicators of economic activity in Canada: empirical evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(1), pages 1-17, February.
    11. Jan Korda, 2010. "Komparace nového konsensu jako teoretického rámce cílování inflace s postkeynesovskou ekonomií
      [A Comparison of New Consensus as a Theoretical Framework of Inflation Targeting with Post-Keynesian E
      ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2010(1), pages 92-104.

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