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Effect of televised, tobacco company - Funded smoking prevention advertising on youth smoking-related beliefs, intentions, and behavior

Author

Listed:
  • Wakefield, M.
  • Terry-McElrath, Y.
  • Emery, S.
  • Saffer, H.
  • Chaloupka, F.J.
  • Szczypka, G.
  • Flay, B.
  • O'Malley, P.M.
  • Johnston, L.D.

Abstract

Objective. To relate exposure to televised youth smoking prevention advertising to youths' smoking beliefs, intentions, and behaviors. Methods. We obtained commercial television ratings data from 75 US media markets to determine the average youth exposure to tobacco company youth-targeted and parent-targeted smoking prevention advertising. We merged these data with nationally representative school-based survey data (n = 103 172) gathered from 1999 to 2002. Multivariate regression models controlled for individual, geographic, and tobacco policy factors, and other televised antitobacco advertising. Results. There was little relation between exposure to tobacco company-sponsored, youth-targeted advertising and youth smoking outcomes. Among youths in grades 10 and 12, during the 4 months leading up to survey administration, each additional viewing of a tobacco company parent-targeted advertisement was, on average, associated with lower perceived harm of smoking (odds ratio [OR] = 0.93; confidence interval [CI] = 0.88, 0.98), stronger approval of smoking (OR = 1.11; CI = 1.03,1.20), stronger intentions to smoke in the future (OR = 1.12; CI = 1.04,1.21), and greater likelihood of having smoked in the past 30 days (OR = 1.12; CI = 1.04,1.19). Conclusions. Exposure to tobacco company youth-targeted smoking prevention advertising generally had no beneficial outcomes for youths. Exposure to tobacco company parent-targeted advertising may have harmful effects on youth, especially among youths in grades 10 and 12.

Suggested Citation

  • Wakefield, M. & Terry-McElrath, Y. & Emery, S. & Saffer, H. & Chaloupka, F.J. & Szczypka, G. & Flay, B. & O'Malley, P.M. & Johnston, L.D., 2006. "Effect of televised, tobacco company - Funded smoking prevention advertising on youth smoking-related beliefs, intentions, and behavior," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 96(12), pages 2154-2160.
  • Handle: RePEc:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2005.083352_9
    DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2005.083352
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    Cited by:

    1. Yang, Zhiyong & Floyd, Kristopher & Tanner, John F., 2019. "Effects of antismoking messages from media on adolescent smoking: The roles of family, school, and culture," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 222-231.
    2. Niko de Silva & Benno Torgler, 2011. "Smoke Signals and Mixed Messages: Medical Marijuana & Drug Policy Signalling Effects," CREMA Working Paper Series 2011-18, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    3. Yang, Zhiyong & Netemeyer, Richard G., 2015. "Differential effects of parenting strategies on child smoking trajectories: A longitudinal assessment over twelve years," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 68(6), pages 1273-1282.
    4. Dixon, Helen G. & Scully, Maree L. & Wakefield, Melanie A. & White, Victoria M. & Crawford, David A., 2007. "The effects of television advertisements for junk food versus nutritious food on children's food attitudes and preferences," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(7), pages 1311-1323, October.
    5. Hoek, Janet & Newcombe, Rhiannon & Walker, Sue, 2011. "Promoting youth smokefree behaviour: An evaluation of a social norms campaign," Australasian marketing journal, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 58-64.
    6. Emily Savell & Anna B Gilmore & Gary Fooks, 2014. "How Does the Tobacco Industry Attempt to Influence Marketing Regulations? A Systematic Review," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 9(2), pages 1-10, February.
    7. Hiromu Nishiuchi & Masataka Taguri & Yoshiki Ishikawa, 2016. "Using a Marginal Structural Model to Design a Theory-Based Mass Media Campaign," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(7), pages 1-12, July.
    8. Niko de Silva & Benno Torgler, 2011. "Smoke Signals and Mixed Messages: Medical Marijuana & Drug Policy Signalling Effects," CREMA Working Paper Series 2011-18, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).

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