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Health Information Availability and the Consumption of Eggs: Are Consumers Bayesians?

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  • Chang, Hung-Hao
  • Just, David R.

Abstract

This study uses a generalized Bayesian updating model to estimate the impact of health information appearing in the popular media on the consumption of eggs. The framework permits us to explore the possible effects of several known psychological biases in learning. Generalized Bayesian learning allows media publications to have a decaying effect on behavior. Our primary finding is that health information has a significant impact on U.S. egg consumption. Furthermore, the reaction to health information is found to be temporary. Health information will, on average, decay to a point of unimportance in a matter of a few weeks without a constant and consistent stream of confirming information.

Suggested Citation

  • Chang, Hung-Hao & Just, David R., 2007. "Health Information Availability and the Consumption of Eggs: Are Consumers Bayesians?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 32(01), April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:8602
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Just, David R., 2006. "Behavioral Economics, Food Assistance, and Obesity," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 35(2), October.
    2. Knutson, Ronald D. & Currier, Russell W. & Ribera, Luis A. & Goeringer, L. Paul, 2010. "Asymmetry In Raw Milk Safety Perceptions And Information: Implications For Risk In Fresh Produce Marketing And Policy," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116440, European Association of Agricultural Economists;Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Bi, Xiang & House, Lisa & Gao, Zhifeng, 2014. "Can Nutrition and Health Information Increase Demand for Seafood among Parents? Evidence from a Choice Experiment," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170266, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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